Tren Griffin

Tren Griffin

I work for Microsoft. Previously I was a partner at Eagle River, a private equity firm established by Craig McCaw. I am on the board of directors of Kymeta.

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100+ Book Recommendations by Tren Griffin

  • Mr. Johnson’s thesis can be summarized without much difficulty: after generations of extravagant and reckless industrial expansion, we are clearly entering an age of economic scarcity. While human demands continue to rise, natural resources, especially the non-renewable kind, become harder to find and more expensive to extract, process, transport and distribute. This simple brute fact is the basic cause of inflation, despite the inability of most professional economists to see it. (The “dismal science” has never been more dismally obtuse than it is today.) The law of diminishing returns is coming into effect. Technological developments can delay the process but not halt or reverse it; nor can we rely on government or big business to save us. Planning for further growth delays the adjustments that must be made, makes a fair sharing of necessary sacrifices more troublesome, and if carried too far will make more severe and painful, because rapid, the inevitable decline of the international economic machine. The best way to deal with the end of affluence is to accept it—not fight it—and to begin, here and now, the unavoidable adaptations, on an individual, family, and community basis. Piecemeal, experimental, and muddling.

    @mims Muddling Toward Frugality is a book on the topic (1978). It is unlikely to be politically popular or trending on Tik Tok though. https://t.co/mxrxE5SQKu If we made more products in the US, the port and warehouse crisis would be smaller. https://t.co/FEdLEGFH9i

  • The Wires of War

    Jacob Helberg

    A new book on cyber warfare drops tomorrow. I read an advance copy and it's worth reading if you're interested in this topic. https://t.co/t9rlxBlNdW

  • The Wires of War

    Jacob Helberg

    From the former News Policy lead at Google, an urgent and groundbreaking account of the high-stakes global cyberwar brewing between Western democracies and the autocracies of China and Russia—that could potentially crush democracy. From 2016 to 2020, Jacob Helberg led Google’s internal global product policy efforts to combat disinformation and foreign interference. During this time, he found himself in the midst of what can only be described as a quickly escalating Cold War between democracy and autocracy. Since the conflict takes place in the murky gray zone over trade routes and fiber optic lines, Helberg calls this developing tech-fueled battle a Gray War. On the front-end, we’re fighting to control the software—applications, news information, social media platforms, and more—of what we see on the screens of our computers, tablets and phones, a clash which started out primarily with Russia, but now increasingly includes China and Iran. Even more ominously, we’re also engaged in a hidden back-end battle—largely with China—to control the Internet’s hardware, which includes devices like cellular phones, satellites, fiber-optic cables, and 5G networks. This Gray War will shape the world’s balance of power for the coming century as autocracies exploit 21st century methods to re-divide the world into 20th century-style spheres of influence. Helberg cautions that the spoils of this war are power over every meaningful aspect of our society, including our economy, our infrastructure, the screens we constantly consult for information and entertainment—and what news we deem as truth. Without a firm partnership with the government, Silicon Valley is unable to protect democracy from the autocrats looking to sabotage it from places like Beijing, Moscow, and Tehran. The stakes of the ongoing cyberwar are no less than our nation’s sovereignty and institutional agency, the freedom of our democratic allies, and even the ability of each of us to control our own fates, Helberg says. And time is running out.

    "The Wires of War: Technology and the Global Struggle for Power" https://t.co/ENc4RQgkFZ The book drops in three days. As everyone knows, a16z partners like me received copies earlier than the general public. . https://t.co/hBMO0xWI3n

  • A Dozen Lessons for Entrepreneurs shows how the insights of leading venture capitalists can teach readers to create a unique approach to building a successful business. By better understanding the views and experiences of a wide range of entrepreneurs, readers can discern which of many possible paths will lead to success.

    1/ Running through the data in this well written thread are themes that I wrote about in my 2017 book "A Dozen Lessons for Entrepreneurs" https://t.co/sQuRjtGtJn and numerous posts on my 25iQ blog at https://t.co/tRXO9ehusq https://t.co/0D2MZk0vzI

  • @SuperMugatu If you want a less well-known book: "If you want to read one book that will demonstrate really shrewd compensation systems in a whole chain of small businesses, read the autobiography of Les Schwab." Charlie Munger, Berkshire AGM 2004 https://t.co/aiay1TLgfS

  • Steve Jobs

    Walter Isaacson

    Draws on more than forty interviews with Steve Jobs, as well as interviews with family members, friends, competitors, and colleagues to offer a look at the co-founder and leading creative force behind the Apple computer company.

    @SuperMugatu A business history book or biography is vastly improved when a professional writer is involved. As an example, J. R. Moehringer ghostwrote Phil Knight's memoir Shoe Dog. I would read a Michael Lewis book about almost anything. Walter Isaacson writes well. https://t.co/W7EEReNzbR

  • Damn Right

    Janet Lowe

    Praise for Damn Right! From the author of the bestselling WARREN BUFFETT SPEAKS. . . "Charlie Munger, whose reputation is deep and wide, based on an extraordinary record of brilliantly successful business strategies, sees things that others don't. There is a method to his mastery and, through this book, we get a chance to learn about this rare individual." -MICHAEL EISNER, Chairman and CEO, The Walt Disney Company "Janet Lowe uncovers the iconoclastic genius and subtle charm behind Charlie Munger's curmudgeonly facade in this richly woven portrait of our era's heir to Ben Franklin. With a biographer's detachment, an historian's thoroughness, and a financial writer's common sense, Lowe produces a riveting account of the family, personal, and business life of the idiosyncratically complex and endlessly fascinating figure." -LAWRENCE CUNNINGHAM, Cardozo Law School, Author of The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America "For years, Berkshire Hathaway shareholders and investors worldwide (me included) have struggled to learn more about Warren Buffett's cerebral sidekick. Now we can rest and enjoy reading Janet Lowe's book about this rare intellectual jewel called Charlie Munger." -ROBERT G. HAGSTROM, Author of The Warren Buffett Way "Charlie has lived by the creed that one should live a life that doesn't need explaining. But his life should be explained. In a city where heroism is too often confused with celebrity, Charlie is a true hero and mentor. He lives the life lessons that he has studiously extracted from other true heroes and mentors, from Ben Franklin to Ben Graham. This book illuminates those life lessons." -RONALD L. OLSON, Munger, Tolles & Olson llp "Janet Lowe's unprecedented access to Charlie Munger and Warren Buffett has resulted in a first-class book that investors, academics, and CEOs will find entertaining and highly useful."-TIMOTHY P. VICK, Money Manager and Author of How to Pick Stocks Like Warren Buffett

    @saroff_nyc @BigRiverCapita1 @DarkfireCapital Janet Lowe wrote a biography of Charlie Munger. https://t.co/zPRhl0GyRL Poor Charlie's is a collection of essays: https://t.co/qcwRDmB3am My Munger book is an analysis. I tried to use his approaches as instructional examples. I said up front: this book is not a biography.

  • Poor Charlie's Almanack

    Charles T. Munger

    @saroff_nyc @BigRiverCapita1 @DarkfireCapital Janet Lowe wrote a biography of Charlie Munger. https://t.co/zPRhl0GyRL Poor Charlie's is a collection of essays: https://t.co/qcwRDmB3am My Munger book is an analysis. I tried to use his approaches as instructional examples. I said up front: this book is not a biography.

  • Buffett

    Roger Lowenstein

    Chronicles Warren Buffett's childhood ambitions, Columbia Business School education, investment strategies, early investments, and affiliation with American Express, Berkshire Hathaway, and ABC.

    @saroff_nyc @BigRiverCapita1 @DarkfireCapital The best Buffett biography is by Lowenstein. https://t.co/GOorzcvWO6 Loomis has a book. https://t.co/7jx1IkMqUt The best analysis of Buffett as an investor and Berkshire's operations are Hagstrom's books. https://t.co/ebxBdIjqpb

  • Tap Dancing to Work

    Carol J. Loomis

    A retrospective collection of top-selected Fortune articles on Warren Buffett from the past half century places them in context and provides fresh commentary to offer insight into the influential investor's views on such topics as management, philanthropy and public policy. 100,000 first printing.

    @saroff_nyc @BigRiverCapita1 @DarkfireCapital The best Buffett biography is by Lowenstein. https://t.co/GOorzcvWO6 Loomis has a book. https://t.co/7jx1IkMqUt The best analysis of Buffett as an investor and Berkshire's operations are Hagstrom's books. https://t.co/ebxBdIjqpb

  • The Warren Buffett Way

    Robert G. Hagstrom

    @saroff_nyc @BigRiverCapita1 @DarkfireCapital The best Buffett biography is by Lowenstein. https://t.co/GOorzcvWO6 Loomis has a book. https://t.co/7jx1IkMqUt The best analysis of Buffett as an investor and Berkshire's operations are Hagstrom's books. https://t.co/ebxBdIjqpb

  • Expectations Investing

    Michael Mauboussin

    "Expectations investing is a stock-selection process that uses the market's own pricing model, the discounted cash flow model, with an important twist. Rather than forecast cash flows, expectations investing starts by reading the expectations implied by a company's stock price. This work builds on chapter 7 in coauthor Al Rappaport's seminal book, Creating Shareholder Value, called "Stock Market Signals to Management." That chapter told executives that they needed to be able to read the expectations built into the stock price of their company in order to understand how to generate superior stock price performance. Expectations Investing tailors that message to investors. The book is unique because rather than calculating a value for a business, as most investment books and textbooks suggest, expectations investing provides the tools to understand the expectations embedded in share price and to judge whether those expectations are reasonable. Gaps between fundamentals and expectations create opportunities to buy or sell a stock. This revised and updated edition will contain new frameworks, data, and case studies that reflect how these ideas still apply in today's investing world, which has changed greatly since the first edition's publication in 2001"--

    @KJC225 @alphaarchitect https://t.co/KbwcrshBAX

  • Expectations Investing

    Michael Mauboussin

    "Expectations investing is a stock-selection process that uses the market's own pricing model, the discounted cash flow model, with an important twist. Rather than forecast cash flows, expectations investing starts by reading the expectations implied by a company's stock price. This work builds on chapter 7 in coauthor Al Rappaport's seminal book, Creating Shareholder Value, called "Stock Market Signals to Management." That chapter told executives that they needed to be able to read the expectations built into the stock price of their company in order to understand how to generate superior stock price performance. Expectations Investing tailors that message to investors. The book is unique because rather than calculating a value for a business, as most investment books and textbooks suggest, expectations investing provides the tools to understand the expectations embedded in share price and to judge whether those expectations are reasonable. Gaps between fundamentals and expectations create opportunities to buy or sell a stock. This revised and updated edition will contain new frameworks, data, and case studies that reflect how these ideas still apply in today's investing world, which has changed greatly since the first edition's publication in 2001"--

    @nachkari "We can distill valuation into three prime components: future cash flows, a required rate of return, and a period of excess returns (which we call competitive advantage period, or CAP)." What does reverse DCF imply about market expectations for a stock? https://t.co/KbwcrshBAX

  • The Second Machine Age

    Erik Brynjolfsson

    A pair of technology experts describe how humans will have to keep pace with machines in order to become prosperous in the future and identify strategies and policies for business and individuals to use to combine digital processing power with human ingenuity.

    @eclabadie @VaclavSmil @erikbryn Excellent book I should have included.

  • @nachkari 1. Soul of a New Machine 2. Where Wizards Stay Up Late 3. A Mind at Play 4. Books by Walter Isaacson like The Innovators, Jobs, DaVinci, Einstein and Franklin 5. Wright Brothers (McCullough) 6. Fire in the Valley 7. Intel Trinity 8. Edison https://t.co/D4jYgxsyef

  • A history of the Internet and the story of the scientists behind its creation describes the 1960s effort funded by the Defense Department and the technologies that contributed to its monumental growth

    @nachkari 1. Soul of a New Machine 2. Where Wizards Stay Up Late 3. A Mind at Play 4. Books by Walter Isaacson like The Innovators, Jobs, DaVinci, Einstein and Franklin 5. Wright Brothers (McCullough) 6. Fire in the Valley 7. Intel Trinity 8. Edison https://t.co/D4jYgxsyef

  • A Mind at Play

    Jimmy Soni

    Winner of the Neumann Prize for the History of Mathematics **Named a best book of the year by Bloomberg and Nature** **'Best of 2017' by The Morning Sun** "We owe Claude Shannon a lot, and Soni & Goodman’s book takes a big first step in paying that debt." —San Francisco Review of Books "Soni and Goodman are at their best when they invoke the wonder an idea can instill. They summon the right level of awe while stopping short of hyperbole." —Financial Times "Jimmy Soni and Rob Goodman make a convincing case for their subtitle while reminding us that Shannon never made this claim himself." —The Wall Street Journal "Soni and Goodman have done their research...A Mind at Play reveals the remarkable human behind some of the most important theoretical and practical contributions to the information age." —Nature "A Mind at Play shows us that you don't need to be a genius to learn from a genius. Claude Shannon's inventive, vibrant life demonstrates how vital the act of play can be to making the most of work." —Inc. “A charming account of one of the twentieth century’s most distinguished scientists…Readers will enjoy this portrait of a modern-day Da Vinci.” —Fortune In their second collaboration, biographers Jimmy Soni and Rob Goodman present the story of Claude Shannon—one of the foremost intellects of the twentieth century and the architect of the Information Age, whose insights stand behind every computer built, email sent, video streamed, and webpage loaded. Claude Shannon was a groundbreaking polymath, a brilliant tinkerer, and a digital pioneer. He constructed the first wearable computer, outfoxed Vegas casinos, and built juggling robots. He also wrote the seminal text of the digital revolution, which has been called “the Magna Carta of the Information Age.” In this elegantly written, exhaustively researched biography, Soni and Goodman reveal Claude Shannon’s full story for the first time. With unique access to Shannon’s family and friends, A Mind at Play brings this singular innovator and always playful genius to life.

    @nachkari 1. Soul of a New Machine 2. Where Wizards Stay Up Late 3. A Mind at Play 4. Books by Walter Isaacson like The Innovators, Jobs, DaVinci, Einstein and Franklin 5. Wright Brothers (McCullough) 6. Fire in the Valley 7. Intel Trinity 8. Edison https://t.co/D4jYgxsyef

  • The Innovators

    Walter Isaacson

    "Following his blockbuster biography of Steve Jobs, The Innovators is Walter Isaacson's revealing story of the people who created the computer and the Internet. It is destined to be the standard history of the digital revolution and an indispensable guide to how innovation really happens. What were the talents that allowed certain inventors and entrepreneurs to turn their visionary ideas into disruptive realities? What led to their creative leaps? Why did some succeed and others fail? In his masterly saga, Isaacson begins with Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron's daughter, who pioneered computer programming in the 1840s. He explores the fascinating personalities that cr eated our current digital revolution, such as Vannevar Bush, Alan Turing, John von Neumann, J.C.R. Licklider, Doug Engelbart, Robert Noyce, Bill Gates, Steve Wozniak, Steve Jobs, Tim Berners-Lee, and Larry Page. This is the story of how their minds worked and what made them so inventive. It's also a narrative of how their ability to collaborate and master the art of teamwork made them even more creative. For an era that seeks to foster innovation, creativity, and teamwork, The Innovators shows how they happen"--

    @nachkari 1. Soul of a New Machine 2. Where Wizards Stay Up Late 3. A Mind at Play 4. Books by Walter Isaacson like The Innovators, Jobs, DaVinci, Einstein and Franklin 5. Wright Brothers (McCullough) 6. Fire in the Valley 7. Intel Trinity 8. Edison https://t.co/D4jYgxsyef

  • The Wright Brothers

    David McCullough

    @nachkari 1. Soul of a New Machine 2. Where Wizards Stay Up Late 3. A Mind at Play 4. Books by Walter Isaacson like The Innovators, Jobs, DaVinci, Einstein and Franklin 5. Wright Brothers (McCullough) 6. Fire in the Valley 7. Intel Trinity 8. Edison https://t.co/D4jYgxsyef

  • The Intel Trinity

    Michael S. Malone

    The definitive history of the Intel Corporation—the essential company of the digital age—told through the lives of its three preeminent figures: Robert Noyce, Gordon Moore, and Andy Grove Intel has often been hailed as the most important company in the world, and with good reason: While technology companies come and go, Intel remains, more than four decades after its inception, a defining company of the global digital economy. The legendary inventor of the microprocessor—the single most significant product in the modern world—Intel today builds the tiny "engines" that power almost every intelligent electronic device on the planet. But the true story of Intel is the human story of the three geniuses behind it. In The Intel Trinity, Michael S. Malone takes an unflinching look at the strengths and weaknesses each member of the trio has brought to Intel, and how, without the perfect balance, the company would never have reached its current level of success. Robert Noyce, the most respected high- tech figure of his generation, brought credibility (and money) to the company's founding; Gordon Moore made Intel the world's technological leader; and Andy Grove relentlessly drove the company to ever-higher levels of success and competitiveness. Without any one of these figures, Intel would never have achieved its historic success; with them, Intel made possible the personal computer, the Internet, telecommunications, and the personal electronics revolution. Based on unprecedented access to corporate archives, The Intel Trinity reveals the fascinating stories behind the company's ubiquitous products and the unique business practices—including a willingness to commit to new ideas, an initiative to make bold investments in lean times, and a devotion to upholding Gordon Moore's namesake law—that led Intel to consistent success unheard of elsewhere in the tech world. The Intel Trinity is not just the story of Intel's legendary past; it is also an analysis of the formidable challenges that lie ahead as the company struggles to maintain its dominance, its culture, and its legacy.

    @nachkari 1. Soul of a New Machine 2. Where Wizards Stay Up Late 3. A Mind at Play 4. Books by Walter Isaacson like The Innovators, Jobs, DaVinci, Einstein and Franklin 5. Wright Brothers (McCullough) 6. Fire in the Valley 7. Intel Trinity 8. Edison https://t.co/D4jYgxsyef

  • Expectations Investing

    Michael Mauboussin

    "Expectations investing is a stock-selection process that uses the market's own pricing model, the discounted cash flow model, with an important twist. Rather than forecast cash flows, expectations investing starts by reading the expectations implied by a company's stock price. This work builds on chapter 7 in coauthor Al Rappaport's seminal book, Creating Shareholder Value, called "Stock Market Signals to Management." That chapter told executives that they needed to be able to read the expectations built into the stock price of their company in order to understand how to generate superior stock price performance. Expectations Investing tailors that message to investors. The book is unique because rather than calculating a value for a business, as most investment books and textbooks suggest, expectations investing provides the tools to understand the expectations embedded in share price and to judge whether those expectations are reasonable. Gaps between fundamentals and expectations create opportunities to buy or sell a stock. This revised and updated edition will contain new frameworks, data, and case studies that reflect how these ideas still apply in today's investing world, which has changed greatly since the first edition's publication in 2001"--

    One fantastic thing about one day delivery is you can receive the new Michael Mauboussin book quickly if you act now. If you have heard him speak at places like Capital Camp or have read his essays and other books you know. The book drops tomorrow. https://t.co/fCPVajafQJ

  • How businesses and other organizations can improve their performance by tapping the power of differences in how people think What if workforce diversity is more than simply the right thing to do in order to make society more integrated and just? What if diversity can also improve the bottom line of businesses and other organizations facing complex challenges in the knowledge economy? It can. And The Diversity Bonus shows how and why. Scott Page, a leading thinker, writer, and speaker whose ideas and advice are sought after by corporations, nonprofits, universities, and governments around the world, makes a clear and compellingly pragmatic case for diversity and inclusion. He presents overwhelming evidence that teams that include different kinds of thinkers outperform homogenous groups on complex tasks, producing what he calls “diversity bonuses.” These bonuses include improved problem solving, increased innovation, and more accurate predictions—all of which lead to better performance and results. Page shows that various types of cognitive diversity—differences in how people perceive, encode, analyze, and organize the same information and experiences—are linked to better outcomes. He then describes how these cognitive differences are influenced by other kinds of diversity, including racial and gender differences—in other words, identity diversity. Identity diversity, therefore, can also produce bonuses. Drawing on research in economics, psychology, computer science, and many other fields, The Diversity Bonus also tells the stories of people and organizations that have tapped the power of diversity to solve complex problems. And the book includes a challenging response from Katherine Phillips of the Columbia Business School. The result changes the way we think about diversity in the workplace—and far beyond it.

    @skupor https://t.co/yA6hTpuObF "Page shows that various types of cognitive diversity―differences in how people perceive, encode, analyze, and organize the same information and experiences―are linked to better outcomes."

  • COMPLEXITY

    M. Mitchell Waldrop

    A look at the rebellious thinkers who are challenging old ideas with their insights into the ways countless elements of complex systems interact to produce spontaneous order out of confusion

    @MorningBrew Complexity: The Emerging Science at the Edge of Order and Chaos, M. Mitchell Waldrop Also: Models of My Life, Herbert Simon Man's Search for Meaning, Viktor E. Frankl Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! Richard Feynman Influence, Robert Cialdini

  • Man's Search for Meaning

    Viktor Emil Frankl

    Viennese psychiatrist tells his grim experiences in a German concentration camp which led him to logotherapy, an existential method of psychiatry.

    @MorningBrew Complexity: The Emerging Science at the Edge of Order and Chaos, M. Mitchell Waldrop Also: Models of My Life, Herbert Simon Man's Search for Meaning, Viktor E. Frankl Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! Richard Feynman Influence, Robert Cialdini

  • In this candid and witty autobiography, Nobel laureate Herbert A. Simon looks at his distinguished and varied career, continually asking himself whether (and how) what he learned as a scientist helps to explain other aspects of his life.A brilliant polymath in an age of increasing specialization, Simon is one of those rare scholars whose work defines fields of inquiry. Crossing disciplinary lines in half a dozen fields, Simon's story encompasses an explosion in the information sciences, the transformation of psychology by the information-processing paradigm, and the use of computer simulation for modeling the behavior of highly complex systems.Simon's theory of bounded rationality led to a Nobel Prize in economics, and his work on building machines that think -- based on the notion that human intelligence is the rule-governed manipulation of symbols -- laid conceptual foundations for the new cognitive science. Subsequently, contrasting metaphors of the maze (Simon's view) and of the mind (neural nets) have dominated the artificial intelligence debate.There is also a warm account of his successful marriage and of an unconsummated love affair, letters to his children, columns, a short story, and political and personal intrigue in academe.

    @MorningBrew Complexity: The Emerging Science at the Edge of Order and Chaos, M. Mitchell Waldrop Also: Models of My Life, Herbert Simon Man's Search for Meaning, Viktor E. Frankl Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! Richard Feynman Influence, Robert Cialdini

  • Warren Buffett

    Robert G. Hagstrom

    In Warren Buffett: Inside the Ultimate Money Mind, Hagstrom breaks new ground with a deep analysis of Buffett’s essential wisdom, an intricate mosaic of wide-ranging ideas and insights that Buffett calls a Money Mind. What exactly is a Money Mind? At one level, it’s a way of thinking about major financial issues such as capital allocation. At another level, it summarizes an overall mindset for successfully investing in today’s fast-paced stock market, a mindset that depends on a commitment to learning, adapting, and facing down irrelevant noise. This is not a method book. It is a thinking book. Warren Buffett: Inside the Ultimate Money Mind explains the philosophies of self-reliance, stoicism, rationalism, and pragmatism and their contributions to making intelligent investment decisions. It also outlines the evolution of value investing, discusses how to develop a business-driven investing mindset, and describes the defining traits of successful active management. Lastly, it examines the surprising aspects of a Money Mind – sportsman, teacher, and artist. In short, Warren Buffett: Inside the Ultimate Money Mind helps readers understand the building blocks that go into making a Money Mind so they can begin to incorporate its principles in the service to a life of value. Testimonials “An erudite masterpiece…” Lawrence A. Cunningham “It’s another must read…” Bethany McLean “Pure Genius. This is a game changer in investment books…” Robert P. Miles “Effervescence and thoughtful analysis of Buffett’s life and work…” Tom Gayner “Hagstrom’s books always enable readers to think about the world in new ways…” Tren Griffin

    I also read in galley format: "Warren Buffett: Inside the Ultimate Money Mind" My back book cover blurb: "Robert Hagstrom’s books always enable readers to think about the world in new ways." Tren Griffin, author, Charlie Munger: The Complete Investor https://t.co/jK4zi8RUfB

  • Expectations Investing

    Michael Mauboussin

    "Expectations investing is a stock-selection process that uses the market's own pricing model, the discounted cash flow model, with an important twist. Rather than forecast cash flows, expectations investing starts by reading the expectations implied by a company's stock price. This work builds on chapter 7 in coauthor Al Rappaport's seminal book, Creating Shareholder Value, called "Stock Market Signals to Management." That chapter told executives that they needed to be able to read the expectations built into the stock price of their company in order to understand how to generate superior stock price performance. Expectations Investing tailors that message to investors. The book is unique because rather than calculating a value for a business, as most investment books and textbooks suggest, expectations investing provides the tools to understand the expectations embedded in share price and to judge whether those expectations are reasonable. Gaps between fundamentals and expectations create opportunities to buy or sell a stock. This revised and updated edition will contain new frameworks, data, and case studies that reflect how these ideas still apply in today's investing world, which has changed greatly since the first edition's publication in 2001"--

    I'm very fortunate to be able to read several books a year early in galley format and this revised edition of Expectations Investing by Michael Mauboussin drops September 8. It is a gem. https://t.co/qggNx1HuQJ https://t.co/hn3W4gyTLe

  • Expectations Investing

    Michael Mauboussin

    "Expectations investing is a stock-selection process that uses the market's own pricing model, the discounted cash flow model, with an important twist. Rather than forecast cash flows, expectations investing starts by reading the expectations implied by a company's stock price. This work builds on chapter 7 in coauthor Al Rappaport's seminal book, Creating Shareholder Value, called "Stock Market Signals to Management." That chapter told executives that they needed to be able to read the expectations built into the stock price of their company in order to understand how to generate superior stock price performance. Expectations Investing tailors that message to investors. The book is unique because rather than calculating a value for a business, as most investment books and textbooks suggest, expectations investing provides the tools to understand the expectations embedded in share price and to judge whether those expectations are reasonable. Gaps between fundamentals and expectations create opportunities to buy or sell a stock. This revised and updated edition will contain new frameworks, data, and case studies that reflect how these ideas still apply in today's investing world, which has changed greatly since the first edition's publication in 2001"--

    @om @bgurley @howardlindzon @pkedrosky @mjmauboussin I don't think about it any differently, but you often are valuing more based on optionality in private firms. I am lucky to have already read the revised version of the Mauboussin/Rappaport book "Expectations Investing" that will be available September 8. https://t.co/vW6AfgTR0t

  • More Than You Know

    Michael J. Mauboussin

    My process was the mistake. Sometimes you have a good outcome with a bad process and sometimes you have a good outcome with a bad process. "The best long-term performers in any probabilistic field -- such as investing... emphasize process over outcome." https://t.co/V5xj8EBrpq https://t.co/jHqkZNs0F6

  • Liftoff

    Eric Berger

    The dramatic inside story of the first four historic flights that launched SpaceX--and Elon Musk--from a shaky startup into the world's leading edge rocket company. In 2006, SpaceX--a brand-new venture with fewer than 200 employees--rolled its first, single-engine rocket onto a launch pad at Kwajalein Atoll. After a groundbreaking launch from the middle of the Pacific Ocean, the Falcon 1 rocket designed by Elon Musk's engineers rose in the air for approximately thirty seconds. Then, its engine flamed out, and the rocket crashed back into the ocean. In 2007, SpaceX undertook a second launch. This time, the rocket rose far into space, but just before reaching orbit it spun out of control. Confident of success in 2008, Musk and his team launched their third rocket with several paying customers. The first stage executed perfectly, but instead of falling away, it thudded into the second stage. Another failure. Elon Musk had only budgeted for three attempts when he founded SpaceX. Out of money and with a single Falcon 1 rocket left in its factory, SpaceX decided to try one last, dramatic launch. Over eight weeks, engineers worked furiously to prepare this final rocket. The fate of Musk's venture mirrored the trajectory of this slender, single-engine rocket aimed toward the skies. If it crashed and burned, so would SpaceX. In September 2008, SpaceX's last chance for success lifted off . . . and accelerated like a dream, soaring into orbit flawlessly. That success would launch a miraculous decade for the company, in which SpaceX grew from building a single-engine rocket to one with a staggering 27 engines; created two different spacecraft, and mastered reusable-rocket descents using mobile drone ships on the open seas. It marked a level of production and achievement that has not been seen since the space race of the 1960s. But these achievements would not have been possible without SpaceX's first four flight tests. Drawing on unparalleled access and exclusive interviews with dozens of former and current employees--engineers, designers, mechanics, and executives, including Elon Musk--Eric Berger tells the complete story of this foundational generation that transformed SpaceX into the world's leading space company. Liftoff includes more than a dozen photographs.

    @vgr Liftoff https://t.co/cKfbr9kT3K

  • A Dozen Lessons for Entrepreneurs shows how the insights of leading venture capitalists can teach readers to create a unique approach to building a successful business. By better understanding the views and experiences of a wide range of entrepreneurs, readers can discern which of many possible paths will lead to success.

    @naresh_sunkara @lpolovets @jposhaughnessy @bznotes @sarah_cone @morganhousel Risk is still the wrong idea in an early stage investing environment. https://t.co/BC21YH8MO3 There are 300 free 25iQ blog posts here: https://t.co/tRXO9ehusq and my book on entrepreneurs and VC which supports a charity called No Kid Hungry. https://t.co/sQuRjtGtJn

  • Doing well with money isn’t necessarily about what you know. It’s about how you behave. And behavior is hard to teach, even to really smart people. Money—investing, personal finance, and business decisions—is typically taught as a math-based field, where data and formulas tell us exactly what to do. But in the real world people don’t make financial decisions on a spreadsheet. They make them at the dinner table, or in a meeting room, where personal history, your own unique view of the world, ego, pride, marketing, and odd incentives are scrambled together. In The Psychology of Money, award-winning author Morgan Housel shares 19 short stories exploring the strange ways people think about money and teaches you how to make better sense of one of life’s most important topics.

    @ajb_powell https://t.co/vQMRJHCazQ

  • Annals of Gullibility

    Stephen Greenspan

    Greenspan presents an unprecedented examination of gullibility, how we develop this tendency to be duped, and what we can do to become less apt to be fooled, or help someone we care about reason in such a way they are impenetrable to guises, lies, and scams.

    Two days after receiving a copy of his book "Annals of Gullibility" a University of Colorado psychiatry professor learned about the Bernard Madoff fraud. One third of his retirement funds were invested with Madoff. https://t.co/lmHLbq8eHN

  • COMPLEXITY

    M. Mitchell Waldrop

    A look at the rebellious thinkers who are challenging old ideas with their insights into the ways countless elements of complex systems interact to produce spontaneous order out of confusion

    Bill Gurley: "My favorite book of all time is a book called 'Complexity.' It’s an analysis of multi-variable nonlinear systems and how they behave. And that includes things like stock market, weather or pandemics." https://t.co/LpEddeYM9g

  • Noise

    Daniel Kahneman

    From the bestselling author of Thinking, Fast and Slow and the co-author of Nudge, a groundbreaking exploration of why most people make bad judgments, and how to control for that noise.​ Imagine that two doctors in the same city give different diagnoses to identical patients -- or that two judges in the same courthouse give different sentences to people who have committed the same crime. Suppose that different food inspectors give different ratings to indistinguishable restaurants -- or that when a company is handling customer complaints, the resolution depends on who happens to be handling the particular complaint. Now imagine that the same doctor, the same judge, the same inspector, or the same company official makes different decisions, depending on whether it is morning or afternoon, or Monday rather than Wednesday. These are examples of noise: variability in judgments that should be identical. In Noise, Daniel Kahneman, Cass R. Sunstein, and Olivier Sibony show how noise contributes significantly to errors in all fields, including medicine, law, economic forecasting, police behavior, food safety, bail, security checks at airports, strategy, and personnel selection. And although noise can be found wherever people make judgments and decisions, individuals and organizations alike are commonly oblivious to the role of chance in their judgments and in their actions. Drawing on the latest findings in psychology and behavioral economics, and the same kind of diligent, insightful research that made Thinking, Fast and Slow and Nudge groundbreaking New York Times bestsellers, Noise explains how and why humans are so susceptible to noise in judgment -- and what we can do about it.

    "Wherever there is judgment, there is noise. Yet, most of the time, individuals and organizations alike are unaware of it. They neglect noise." Robert Cialdini, Annie Duke, Philip Tetlock and Angela Duckworth give glowing back cover blurbs. https://t.co/eKL6l2po5K

  • Liftoff

    Eric Berger

    The dramatic inside story of the first four historic flights that launched SpaceX--and Elon Musk--from a shaky startup into the world's leading edge rocket company. In 2006, SpaceX--a brand-new venture with fewer than 200 employees--rolled its first, single-engine rocket onto a launch pad at Kwajalein Atoll. After a groundbreaking launch from the middle of the Pacific Ocean, the Falcon 1 rocket designed by Elon Musk's engineers rose in the air for approximately thirty seconds. Then, its engine flamed out, and the rocket crashed back into the ocean. In 2007, SpaceX undertook a second launch. This time, the rocket rose far into space, but just before reaching orbit it spun out of control. Confident of success in 2008, Musk and his team launched their third rocket with several paying customers. The first stage executed perfectly, but instead of falling away, it thudded into the second stage. Another failure. Elon Musk had only budgeted for three attempts when he founded SpaceX. Out of money and with a single Falcon 1 rocket left in its factory, SpaceX decided to try one last, dramatic launch. Over eight weeks, engineers worked furiously to prepare this final rocket. The fate of Musk's venture mirrored the trajectory of this slender, single-engine rocket aimed toward the skies. If it crashed and burned, so would SpaceX. In September 2008, SpaceX's last chance for success lifted off . . . and accelerated like a dream, soaring into orbit flawlessly. That success would launch a miraculous decade for the company, in which SpaceX grew from building a single-engine rocket to one with a staggering 27 engines; created two different spacecraft, and mastered reusable-rocket descents using mobile drone ships on the open seas. It marked a level of production and achievement that has not been seen since the space race of the 1960s. But these achievements would not have been possible without SpaceX's first four flight tests. Drawing on unparalleled access and exclusive interviews with dozens of former and current employees--engineers, designers, mechanics, and executives, including Elon Musk--Eric Berger tells the complete story of this foundational generation that transformed SpaceX into the world's leading space company. Liftoff includes more than a dozen photographs.

    13/ This in Chapter 1 makes me excited about the rest of the book: "There are basically two approaches to building complex systems like rockets: linear and iterative design." "The mantra with [iterative] is build and test early, find failures and adapt." (Page 24 Liftoff)

  • Warren Buffett

    Robert G. Hagstrom

    In Warren Buffett: Inside the Ultimate Money Mind, Hagstrom breaks new ground with a deep analysis of Buffett’s essential wisdom, an intricate mosaic of wide-ranging ideas and insights that Buffett calls a Money Mind. What exactly is a Money Mind? At one level, it’s a way of thinking about major financial issues such as capital allocation. At another level, it summarizes an overall mindset for successfully investing in today’s fast-paced stock market, a mindset that depends on a commitment to learning, adapting, and facing down irrelevant noise. This is not a method book. It is a thinking book. Warren Buffett: Inside the Ultimate Money Mind explains the philosophies of self-reliance, stoicism, rationalism, and pragmatism and their contributions to making intelligent investment decisions. It also outlines the evolution of value investing, discusses how to develop a business-driven investing mindset, and describes the defining traits of successful active management. Lastly, it examines the surprising aspects of a Money Mind – sportsman, teacher, and artist. In short, Warren Buffett: Inside the Ultimate Money Mind helps readers understand the building blocks that go into making a Money Mind so they can begin to incorporate its principles in the service to a life of value. Testimonials “An erudite masterpiece…” Lawrence A. Cunningham “It’s another must read…” Bethany McLean “Pure Genius. This is a game changer in investment books…” Robert P. Miles “Effervescence and thoughtful analysis of Buffett’s life and work…” Tom Gayner “Hagstrom’s books always enable readers to think about the world in new ways…” Tren Griffin

    7/ One passage that sticks out in Robert Hagstrom's very new book on Warren Buffett ("Inside the Ultimate Money Mind") is set out below in an attachment. I read Robert Hagstrom's new book in galley format and now am reading it again in hard cover. https://t.co/ybAu5CbZCc https://t.co/jYPjTtRQZW

  • Investing

    Robert Hagstrom

    In this updated second edition, well-known investment author Hagstrom explores basic and fundamental investing concepts in a range of fields outside of economics, including physics, biology, sociology, psychology, philosophy, and literature.

    @Fritz844 Robert Hagstrom writes about the link between liberal arts/philosophy and investing. https://t.co/f20VCtWG29. https://t.co/NwoMbe9sIp

  • Charlie Munger

    Tren Griffin

    This book presents the essential steps of Charlie Munger's investing strategy, condensed from interviews, speeches, writings, and shareholder letters and paired with commentary from fund managers, value investors, and business-case historians. Munger's approach is straightforward enough that ordinary investors can apply it to their portfolios.

    @juliagalef Deprival Superreaction Hammer Syndrome Inversion Kantian Fairness Tendency Lollapalooza Tendency Loss Aversion Lake Wobegone Effect (see Overconfidence) Liking/Loving Tendency Reason-Respecting Tendency Reciprocity Social-Proof Tendency Twaddle Tendency https://t.co/bU9NK1S476

  • Money from Thin Air

    O. Casey Corr

    A portrait of visionary entrepreneur Craig McCaw discusses his seminal role in the development of the cellular communications industry and his latest work with Teledesic, a satellite network providing fast, economical worldwide Internet access. 20,000 first printing.

    @trmcdonald @chrisamccoy https://t.co/eltLynCCRy

  • Self-organized criticality, the spontaneous development of systems to a critical state, is the first general theory of complex systems with a firm mathematical basis. This theory describes how many seemingly desperate aspects of the world, from stock market crashes to mass extinctions, avalanches to solar flares, all share a set of simple, easily described properties. "...a'must read'...Bak writes with such ease and lucidity, and his ideas are so intriguing...essential reading for those interested in complex systems...it will reward a sufficiently skeptical reader." -NATURE "...presents the theory (self-organized criticality) in a form easily absorbed by the non-mathematically inclined reader." -BOSTON BOOK REVIEW "I picture Bak as a kind of scientific musketeer; flamboyant, touchy, full of swagger and ready to join every fray... His book is written with panache. The style is brisk, the content stimulating. I recommend it as a bracing experience." -NEW SCIENTIST

    Self organized criticality- The snowmobiler's death marks the latest in a series of deadly avalanches that have killed 29 people across the US this winter. The deadliest avalanche years occurred in 2008 and 2010, when there were 36 avalanche fatalities. https://t.co/VT2Hnc9dFQ

  • @jaltma The Misbehavior of Markets: A Fractal View of Financial Turbulence, https://t.co/x73pFUqlgf

  • Cable Cowboy

    Mark Robichaux

    An inside look at a cable titan and his industry John Malone, hailed as one of the great unsung heroes of our age by some and reviled by others as a ruthless robber baron, is revealed as a bit of both in Cable Cowboy. For more than twenty-five years, Malone has dominated the cable television industry, shaping the world of entertainment and communications, first with his cable company TCI and later with Liberty Media. Written with Malone's unprecedented cooperation, the engaging narrative brings this controversial capitalist and businessman to life. Cable Cowboy is at once a penetrating portrait of Malone's complex persona, and a captivating history of the cable TV industry. Told in a lively style with exclusive details, the book shows how an unassuming copper strand started as a backwoods antenna service and became the digital nervous system of the U.S., an evolution that gave U.S. consumers the fastest route to the Internet. Cable Cowboy reveals the forces that propelled this pioneer to such great heights, and captures the immovable conviction and quicksilver mind that have defined John Malone throughout his career.

    @zackkanter @kevinakwok Both are important books. The John Malone book could be better since there is not enough material on why and how versus who and when.

  • Korea in an era of growth

    Trenholme J Griffin

    @amcafee @benedictevans The rise of software eclipsed hardware and new competing Tigers like Korea copied and improved the Japanese model. I was living in Seoul then and saw it happen. My book about the shift is: https://t.co/pZFBhB1VjN

  • Self-organized criticality, the spontaneous development of systems to a critical state, is the first general theory of complex systems with a firm mathematical basis. This theory describes how many seemingly desperate aspects of the world, from stock market crashes to mass extinctions, avalanches to solar flares, all share a set of simple, easily described properties. "...a'must read'...Bak writes with such ease and lucidity, and his ideas are so intriguing...essential reading for those interested in complex systems...it will reward a sufficiently skeptical reader." -NATURE "...presents the theory (self-organized criticality) in a form easily absorbed by the non-mathematically inclined reader." -BOSTON BOOK REVIEW "I picture Bak as a kind of scientific musketeer; flamboyant, touchy, full of swagger and ready to join every fray... His book is written with panache. The style is brisk, the content stimulating. I recommend it as a bracing experience." -NEW SCIENTIST

    When people ask me for papers and books that have influenced how I think and act I tend to forget the work of Per Bak. That's an error on my part. "How Nature Works: The Science of Self-Organised Criticality." https://t.co/h7WeV5lsdF https://t.co/DwYN8DZkDz

  • Expectations Investing

    Alfred Rappaport

    Expectations Investing is well worth picking up. -Financial Executive Expectations Investing offers a fundamentally new alternative for identifying value-price gaps, built around a deceptively simple and obvious tool: a company's stock price. The authors walk readers step-by-step through their breakthrough method, revealing how portfolio managers, security analysts, investment advisors, and individual investors can more accurately evaluate established and "new economy" stocks alike-and translate shareholder value from theory to reality. AUTHORBIO: Alfred Rappaport directs Shareholder Value Research for L.E.K. Consulting and is a Professor Emeritus at Northwestern's Kellogg School. Michael J. Mauboussin is Credit Suisse First Boston's Chief U.S. Investment Strategist and an adjunct professor at Columbia University.

    I use a multiple in evaluating a business exactly never. I do have a tech circle of competence. I watch the cycle and calibrate when doing asset allocation. My cash right now is historically high. My investing approach like Munger's is expected value. https://t.co/TEMDQTaoCo https://t.co/IEKWhgq0Ph

  • A Dozen Lessons for Entrepreneurs shows how the insights of leading venture capitalists can teach readers to create a unique approach to building a successful business. By better understanding the views and experiences of a wide range of entrepreneurs, readers can discern which of many possible paths will lead to success.

    @irrvrntVC @brooksmorgan @anothercohen @PitchBook One of my blog posts: https://t.co/waYcBZL0KT Another: https://t.co/t3YTPXoRi8 My book which raises money for charity: https://t.co/sQuRjtGtJn

  • Influence

    Robert B. Cialdini

    Dr Robert Cialdini explains the six psychological principles that drive the human impulse to comply to the pressures of others and reveals how to defend oneself against manipulation.

    @jenntejada Best gift a parent can give: https://t.co/YLMVVM81so

  • Expectations Investing

    Alfred Rappaport

    Expectations Investing is well worth picking up. -Financial Executive Expectations Investing offers a fundamentally new alternative for identifying value-price gaps, built around a deceptively simple and obvious tool: a company's stock price. The authors walk readers step-by-step through their breakthrough method, revealing how portfolio managers, security analysts, investment advisors, and individual investors can more accurately evaluate established and "new economy" stocks alike-and translate shareholder value from theory to reality. AUTHORBIO: Alfred Rappaport directs Shareholder Value Research for L.E.K. Consulting and is a Professor Emeritus at Northwestern's Kellogg School. Michael J. Mauboussin is Credit Suisse First Boston's Chief U.S. Investment Strategist and an adjunct professor at Columbia University.

    @patrickbrun https://t.co/YwkGRETliB

  • Presents twelve stories of success or disasters among prominent companies, including the disastrous Ford Edsel, the rise of Xerox, and the scandal at General Electric.

    @m2jr You asked for a business book recommendation. What businesses did Drucker, Chandler or Porter actually run? Buffett recommends: Business Adventures, by John Brooks https://t.co/evE1ZBKEOK

  • Shoe Dog

    Phil Knight

    In this instant and tenacious New York Times bestseller, Nike founder and board chairman Phil Knight “offers a rare and revealing look at the notoriously media-shy man behind the swoosh” (Booklist, starred review), illuminating his company’s early days as an intrepid start-up and its evolution into one of the world’s most iconic, game-changing, and profitable brands. Bill Gates named Shoe Dog one of his five favorite books of 2016 and called it “an amazing tale, a refreshingly honest reminder of what the path to business success really looks like. It’s a messy, perilous, and chaotic journey, riddled with mistakes, endless struggles, and sacrifice. Phil Knight opens up in ways few CEOs are willing to do.” Fresh out of business school, Phil Knight borrowed fifty dollars from his father and launched a company with one simple mission: import high-quality, low-cost running shoes from Japan. Selling the shoes from the trunk of his car in 1963, Knight grossed eight thousand dollars that first year. Today, Nike’s annual sales top $30 billion. In this age of start-ups, Knight’s Nike is the gold standard, and its swoosh is one of the few icons instantly recognized in every corner of the world. But Knight, the man behind the swoosh, has always been a mystery. In Shoe Dog, he tells his story at last. At twenty-four, Knight decides that rather than work for a big corporation, he will create something all his own, new, dynamic, different. He details the many risks he encountered, the crushing setbacks, the ruthless competitors and hostile bankers—as well as his many thrilling triumphs. Above all, he recalls the relationships that formed the heart and soul of Nike, with his former track coach, the irascible and charismatic Bill Bowerman, and with his first employees, a ragtag group of misfits and savants who quickly became a band of swoosh-crazed brothers. Together, harnessing the electrifying power of a bold vision and a shared belief in the transformative power of sports, they created a brand—and a culture—that changed everything.

    @TSOH_Investing Shoe Dog is a book about important parts of running a real business. It's not an investing or finance book. Phil Knight worked with a ghost writer who told a story. Shoe Dog reminds me of this book about Les Schwab, which Buffett and Munger both recommend:https://t.co/aiay1TLgfS

  • @m2jr I'll be different and say: "Les Schwab Pride in Performance: Keep It Going" https://t.co/aiay1TLgfS This is a book about running a business rather than an investing or finance book. It is similar to Shoe Dog. Bill Gurley's business book list is solid: https://t.co/Q2KoA0sAhh

  • Complexity

    M. Mitchell Waldrop

    @oleary_brandon https://t.co/ZHNUeqohFp

  • I met Mandelbrot only once at this lecture at before he passed away in 2010. He wrote the book "The Misbehavior of Markets: A Fractal View of Financial Turbulence." I suggest you read this book for yourself (even though it is not an easy book to read). https://t.co/g93VpBUQm0

  • Influence

    Robert B. Cialdini

    Dr Robert Cialdini explains the six psychological principles that drive the human impulse to comply to the pressures of others and reveals how to defend oneself against manipulation.

    @choffstein Charlie Munger: "Fairly late in life I stumbled into this book, Influence, by a psychologist named Bob Cialdini. It filled in a lot of holes in my crude system. You will never make a better investment.” https://t.co/q65GBtu5e9

  • More Than You Know

    Michael Mauboussin

    Since its first publication, Michael J. Mauboussin's popular guide to wise investing has been translated into eight languages and has been named best business book by BusinessWeek and best economics book by Strategy+Business. Now updated to reflect current research and expanded to include new chapters on investment philosophy, psychology, and strategy and science as they pertain to money management, this volume is more than ever the best chance to know more than the average investor. Offering invaluable tools to better understand the concepts of choice and risk, More Than You Know is a unique blend of practical advice and sound theory, sampling from a wide variety of sources and disciplines. Mauboussin builds on the ideas of visionaries, including Warren Buffett and E. O. Wilson, but also finds wisdom in a broad and deep range of fields, such as casino gambling, horse racing, psychology, and evolutionary biology. He analyzes the strategies of poker experts David Sklansky and Puggy Pearson and pinpoints parallels between mate selection in guppies and stock market booms. For this edition, Mauboussin includes fresh thoughts on human cognition, management assessment, game theory, the role of intuition, and the mechanisms driving the market's mood swings, and explains what these topics tell us about smart investing. More Than You Know is written with the professional investor in mind but extends far beyond the world of economics and finance. Mauboussin groups his essays into four parts-Investment Philosophy, Psychology of Investing, Innovation and Competitive Strategy, and Science and Complexity Theory-and he includes substantial references for further reading. A true eye-opener, More Than You Know shows how a multidisciplinary approach that pays close attention to process and the psychology of decision making offers the best chance for long-term financial results.

    On Covid, please remember: “A margin of safety is available for absorbing the effect of miscalculations or worse than average luck." “A lesson inherent in any probabilistic exercise: the frequency of correctness doesn't matter; it's magnitude of correctness that matters.” MM https://t.co/rXhwVOnMFy

  • Eat a Peach

    David Chang

    "The chef behind Momofuku and star of Netflix's Ugly Delicious gets uncomfortably real in his debut memoir"--

    6/ David Chang is saying in this interview that the independent restaurant business was struggling before Covid delivered a new gut punch. Chang has a new book out that I will read over the holidays. https://t.co/MVvI8JVahb Shades of Tony Bourdain's Kitchen Confidential.

  • Shoe Dog

    Phil Knight

    In this instant and tenacious New York Times bestseller, Nike founder and board chairman Phil Knight “offers a rare and revealing look at the notoriously media-shy man behind the swoosh” (Booklist, starred review), illuminating his company’s early days as an intrepid start-up and its evolution into one of the world’s most iconic, game-changing, and profitable brands. Bill Gates named Shoe Dog one of his five favorite books of 2016 and called it “an amazing tale, a refreshingly honest reminder of what the path to business success really looks like. It’s a messy, perilous, and chaotic journey, riddled with mistakes, endless struggles, and sacrifice. Phil Knight opens up in ways few CEOs are willing to do.” Fresh out of business school, Phil Knight borrowed fifty dollars from his father and launched a company with one simple mission: import high-quality, low-cost running shoes from Japan. Selling the shoes from the trunk of his car in 1963, Knight grossed eight thousand dollars that first year. Today, Nike’s annual sales top $30 billion. In this age of start-ups, Knight’s Nike is the gold standard, and its swoosh is one of the few icons instantly recognized in every corner of the world. But Knight, the man behind the swoosh, has always been a mystery. In Shoe Dog, he tells his story at last. At twenty-four, Knight decides that rather than work for a big corporation, he will create something all his own, new, dynamic, different. He details the many risks he encountered, the crushing setbacks, the ruthless competitors and hostile bankers—as well as his many thrilling triumphs. Above all, he recalls the relationships that formed the heart and soul of Nike, with his former track coach, the irascible and charismatic Bill Bowerman, and with his first employees, a ragtag group of misfits and savants who quickly became a band of swoosh-crazed brothers. Together, harnessing the electrifying power of a bold vision and a shared belief in the transformative power of sports, they created a brand—and a culture—that changed everything.

    @TSOH_Investing Shoe Dog is a great business book and a fun story. The ghost writer was JR Moehringer, an American novelist and journalist. In 2000 he won the Pulitzer Prize for newspaper feature writing. https://t.co/kKC0s2sr2E

  • Information Rules

    Carl Shapiro

    As one of the first books to distill the economics of information and networks into practical business strategies, this is a guide to the winning moves that can help business leaders--from writers, lawyers and finance professional to executives in the entertainment, publishing and hardware and software industries-- navigate successfully through the information economy.

    @patrick_oshag Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy by Carl Shapiro and Hal R. Varian https://t.co/t2SuJBDQxl and this paper by Jim Gray on "Distributed Computing Economics" clarified my thinking rather than changing it. https://t.co/PPKyEt8APJ

  • Geodesic Network

    Peter W. Huber

    @patrick_oshag Another book that changed my views instead of just clarifying them was "The Geodesic Network: 1987 Report on Competition in the Telephone Industry by Peter Huber – January 1, 1987 https://t.co/5lNZh1G8aA

  • DIVPioneering work on an important new approach to economics. /div

    @patrick_oshag "Increasing Returns and Path Dependence in the Economy" by Brian Arthur (University of Michigan Press, 1994) https://t.co/QPLQaBXAhJ I may have read his earlier papers before this book. Bill Gurley, Michael Mauboussin and I started talking about increasing returns about then.

  • Korea in an era of growth

    Trenholme J Griffin

    @LibertyRPF This book was written by me in 1987 and published by Euromoney in 1988 pre-Internet. The manuscript was created on a Wang word processor by day and an Apple 2 at night (sent to the publisher on floppy disks). Most correspondence with Euromoney was by Telex.https://t.co/pZFBhB1VjN https://t.co/oYP45UHiGO

  • Expectations Investing

    Alfred Rappaport

    Expectations Investing is well worth picking up. -Financial Executive Expectations Investing offers a fundamentally new alternative for identifying value-price gaps, built around a deceptively simple and obvious tool: a company's stock price. The authors walk readers step-by-step through their breakthrough method, revealing how portfolio managers, security analysts, investment advisors, and individual investors can more accurately evaluate established and "new economy" stocks alike-and translate shareholder value from theory to reality. AUTHORBIO: Alfred Rappaport directs Shareholder Value Research for L.E.K. Consulting and is a Professor Emeritus at Northwestern's Kellogg School. Michael J. Mauboussin is Credit Suisse First Boston's Chief U.S. Investment Strategist and an adjunct professor at Columbia University.

    If you are an investor and have not read Expectations Investing you only have yourself to blame: https://t.co/YwkGRETliB

  • Ah Mo

    Arthur Griffin

    These never before published native legends from the Pacific Northwest were collected by Judge Arthur Griffin and have been passed down through the generations in the Griffin Family since 1884.

    My Great Grandfather collected stories from Native Americans as part of his work as a lawyer to help them assert their treaty rights. His clients called him "Old Stone Axe." Those stories are collected in two books that I edited: https://t.co/XvlsNuucsN

  • The Global Negotiator

    Jeswald W. Salacuse

    In today's global business environment, an executive must have the skills and knowledge to navigate all stages of an international deal, from negotiations to managing the deal after it is signed. The aim of The Global Negotiator is to equip business executives with that exact knowledge. Whereas most books on negotiation end when the deal is made, Jeswald W. Salacuse will guide the reader from the first handshake with a potential foreign partner to the intricacies of making the international joint venture succeed and prosper, or should things go poorly, how to deal with getting out of a deal gone wrong. Salacuse illustrates the many ways in which an international deal may falter and the methods parties can use to save it, provides the necessary technical knowledge to structure specific business transactions, and explores the transformations to the international business landscape over the last decade.

    The stories in The Global Negotiator are almost always about events that happened in my life or my co-author's life. Our book is available free in this digital format: https://t.co/qMeWN739vJ Humans are storytelling creatures - both on the telling and the receiving sides. https://t.co/GqeuKmPA8w

  • Complexity

    M. Mitchell Waldrop

    A look at the rebellious thinkers who are challenging old ideas with insights into ways countless elements of complex systems interact to produce spontaneous order out of confusion discusses politics, economics, and biology. 40,000 first printing.

    @ClarkSquareCap M. Mitchell Waldrop COMPLEXITY: THE EMERGING SCIENCE AT THE EDGE OF ORDER AND CHAOS https://t.co/ba6oL5c7BL

  • Damn Right

    Margaret A. Lowe Janet C. Lowe

    @John_Stepek Damn Right. https://t.co/yJ1oSuKvlR https://t.co/PKL8ZcVyKQ.

  • Charlie Munger

    Tren Griffin

    This book presents the essential steps of Charlie Munger's investing strategy, condensed from interviews, speeches, writings, and shareholder letters and paired with commentary from fund managers, value investors, and business-case historians. Munger's approach is straightforward enough that ordinary investors can apply it to their portfolios.

    @John_Stepek Damn Right. https://t.co/yJ1oSuKvlR https://t.co/PKL8ZcVyKQ.

  • Cable Cowboy

    Mark Robichaux

    An inside look at a cable titan and his industry John Malone, hailed as one of the great unsung heroes of our age by some and reviled by others as a ruthless robber baron, is revealed as a bit of both in Cable Cowboy. For more than twenty-five years, Malone has dominated the cable television industry, shaping the world of entertainment and communications, first with his cable company TCI and later with Liberty Media. Written with Malone's unprecedented cooperation, the engaging narrative brings this controversial capitalist and businessman to life. Cable Cowboy is at once a penetrating portrait of Malone's complex persona, and a captivating history of the cable TV industry. Told in a lively style with exclusive details, the book shows how an unassuming copper strand started as a backwoods antenna service and became the digital nervous system of the U.S., an evolution that gave U.S. consumers the fastest route to the Internet. Cable Cowboy reveals the forces that propelled this pioneer to such great heights, and captures the immovable conviction and quicksilver mind that have defined John Malone throughout his career.

    20/ "A big operator like TCI could give a new network a big head start, and as valuable as its laid wires were, if the cable industry kept growing, the new networks now launching could be even more valuable." Cable Cowboy https://t.co/0KyE6kA6oN To be continued later today.

  • When people ask me for more theoretical material to read about the nature of the dispute between Wheezy and Birdman, I suggest they read "The Essential John Nash" which digs into Nash equilibrium" and "Nash bargaining." Get yourself a better BATNA baby! https://t.co/twfzaAKpaP

  • A Dozen Lessons for Entrepreneurs shows how the insights of leading venture capitalists can teach readers to create a unique approach to building a successful business. By better understanding the views and experiences of a wide range of entrepreneurs, readers can discern which of many possible paths will lead to success.

    @aGabrielJones @auren Started at zero in 1994. Seven years. Raised $1.3 billion. That 1994 was a while ago means bupkis when you are my age. You are mistaken about who pays a salary. Having the right VC is non-trivially important. My book is https://t.co/sQuRjtGtJn

  • Discusses the future of information technology and how these new technologies will change the way people work, learn, buy, and communicate with each other

    1/ "What is the best book about Microsoft as a business?" is a question I get asked a lot. The best account is chapter 3 in "The Road Ahead" written by Bill Gates. Perhaps I am biased because I helped with that book. The unauthorized biographies are incomplete and often fictional https://t.co/ZUhvM47YF7

  • Widely respected and admired, Philip Fisher is among the most influential investors of all time. His investment philosophies, introduced almost forty years ago, are not only studied and applied by today's financiers and investors, but are also regarded by many as gospel. This book is invaluable reading and has been since it was first published in 1958. The updated paperback retains the investment wisdom of the original edition and includes the perspectives of the author's son Ken Fisher, an investment guru in his own right in an expanded preface and introduction "I sought out Phil Fisher after reading his Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits...A thorough understanding of the business, obtained by using Phil's techniques...enables one to make intelligent investment commitments." —Warren Buffet

    9/ "The business grapevine is a remarkable thing. An accurate picture of the relative points of strength and weakness can be obtained from a representative cross-section of the opinions of those who in one way or another are concerned with any particular company.” Phil Fisher https://t.co/HvayPJzcxA

  • Discusses the future of information technology and how these new technologies will change the way people work, learn, buy, and communicate with each other

    @kylerhasson @yourMTLbroker Bill Gates wrote a few pages in his first book "The Road Ahead" about the business. I helped out with editorial suggestions on that book. The best first party account of what happened at Microsoft in terms of the business is this interview with Bill: https://t.co/HdBnavYUi8

  • A Dozen Lessons for Entrepreneurs shows how the insights of leading venture capitalists can teach readers to create a unique approach to building a successful business. By better understanding the views and experiences of a wide range of entrepreneurs, readers can discern which of many possible paths will lead to success.

    2/ As an example, I wrote 300 blog posts at 25iQ. To raise money for charity, I selected ~ 40 blog posts, removed them from the web and published them in traditional book format. The essays were professionally edited, but ~ the same. What's the difference? https://t.co/sQuRjtGtJn

  • The Innovative University illustrates how higher education can respond to the forces of disruptive innovation , and offers a nuanced and hopeful analysis of where the traditional university and its traditions have come from and how it needs to change for the future. Through an examination of Harvard and BYU-Idaho as well as other stories of innovation in higher education, Clayton Christensen and Henry Eyring decipher how universities can find innovative, less costly ways of performing their uniquely valuable functions. Offers new ways forward to deal with curriculum, faculty issues, enrollment, retention, graduation rates, campus facility usage, and a host of other urgent issues in higher education Discusses a strategic model to ensure economic vitality at the traditional university Contains novel insights into the kind of change that is necessary to move institutions of higher education forward in innovative ways This book uncovers how the traditional university survives by breaking with tradition, but thrives by building on what it's done best.

    In his book "The Innovative University" Clayton Christensen explains that college is designed around four years to get a degree because at the time Harvard needed revenue from the extra year. https://t.co/1ob6nD3UgP

  • 'wichcraft

    Tom Colicchio

    Shares the secrets behind the 'wichcraft restaurant group's spin on the sandwich, with recipes for all of their most popular offerings and essays on stocking the sandwich pantry, the architecture of a structurally sound sandwich, and much more.

    @liz99212638 https://t.co/h2r4ShJ4ca https://t.co/T5HjQ18jLa

  • Cable Cowboy

    Mark Robichaux

    An inside look at a cable titan and his industry John Malone, hailed as one of the great unsung heroes of our age by some and reviled by others as a ruthless robber baron, is revealed as a bit of both in Cable Cowboy. For more than twenty-five years, Malone has dominated the cable television industry, shaping the world of entertainment and communications, first with his cable company TCI and later with Liberty Media. Written with Malone's unprecedented cooperation, the engaging narrative brings this controversial capitalist and businessman to life. Cable Cowboy is at once a penetrating portrait of Malone's complex persona, and a captivating history of the cable TV industry. Told in a lively style with exclusive details, the book shows how an unassuming copper strand started as a backwoods antenna service and became the digital nervous system of the U.S., an evolution that gave U.S. consumers the fastest route to the Internet. Cable Cowboy reveals the forces that propelled this pioneer to such great heights, and captures the immovable conviction and quicksilver mind that have defined John Malone throughout his career.

    7/ One quaity I look for in a book is a real desire of the author to educate readers. I put writers like Michael Mauboussin and Jason Zweig at the top of my list on that dimension. Sometimes a great story makes the book valuable like Shoe Dog, Cable Cowboy or the Les Schwab book https://t.co/4q9idW3jeR

  • Margin of Safety

    Seth A. Klarman

    Tells how to avoid investment fads, explains the basic concepts of value-investment philosophy, and offers advice on portfolio management

    5/ Who said: "A margin of safety is [is intended to] allow for human error, bad luck, or extreme volatility in a complex, unpredictable and rapidly changing world.” Clue: He wrote a book with the title https://t.co/VYDwa1bYve Why is a used copy selling for more than $1,000?

  • "Sol Price: Retail Revolutionary and Social Innovator, recounts the extraordinary life of a man who profoundly impacted the shopping habits of consumers in the United States and throughout much of the world. Written by Sol's son Robert Price, this narrative--part biography and part memoir--provides a unique insight into his father's life... As a retail revolutionary, Sol's creative brilliance changed the way we shop, first with FedMart in 1954, the retail format copied by Walmart, Kmart, and Target in 1962, and then, with the Price Club, the warehouse club format adopted by Costco and Sam's Club in 1983. Self-service shopping in large florescent-lit buildings has become part of the American culture and is now the predominant mode of shopping thought most of the world" --Dust jacket.

    @MikeBoyd @ErnestWongBWM I haven't written that book yet. But there is https://t.co/bktoeGS1ny

  • @zck Everyone knows that the only lists worth reading have a dozen lessons. https://t.co/xcJJ3XE9XU

  • The Warren Buffett Way

    Robert G. Hagstrom

    I recommend "The Warren Buffett Way" a book by author Robert Hagstrom. The first edition, published in 1994, sold over a million copies and spent 21 weeks on the New York Times Best Seller list. If you know anything about publishing business titles, that's a *lot* of books.

  • Ah Mo

    Arthur Griffin

    These never before published native legends from the Pacific Northwest were collected by Judge Arthur Griffin and have been passed down through the generations in the Griffin Family since 1884.

    @peg9136 The bedtime stories I was told as a child I rewrote in the form of a book entitled "Ah Mo." I rewrote the stories to make them less scary than the originals tho. 100% my book income goes to charity so there is no CAC or LTV! https://t.co/XvlsNuucsN

  • Shoe Dog

    Phil Knight

    In this candid and riveting memoir, for the first time ever, Nike founder and CEO Phil Knight shares the inside story of the company’s early days as an intrepid start-up and its evolution into one of the world’s most iconic, game-changing, and profitable brands. In 1962, fresh out of business school, Phil Knight borrowed $50 from his father and created a company with a simple mission: import high-quality, low-cost athletic shoes from Japan. Selling the shoes from the trunk of his lime green Plymouth Valiant, Knight grossed $8,000 his first year. Today, Nike’s annual sales top $30 billion. In an age of startups, Nike is the ne plus ultra of all startups, and the swoosh has become a revolutionary, globe-spanning icon, one of the most ubiquitous and recognizable symbols in the world today. But Knight, the man behind the swoosh, has always remained a mystery. Now, for the first time, in a memoir that is candid, humble, gutsy, and wry, he tells his story, beginning with his crossroads moment. At 24, after backpacking around the world, he decided to take the unconventional path, to start his own business—a business that would be dynamic, different. Knight details the many risks and daunting setbacks that stood between him and his dream—along with his early triumphs. Above all, he recalls the formative relationships with his first partners and employees, a ragtag group of misfits and seekers who became a tight-knit band of brothers. Together, harnessing the transcendent power of a shared mission, and a deep belief in the spirit of sport, they built a brand that changed everything.

    What are the best books and other resources that might help people manage cash better in their business right now? There must be many people thinking and worried about cash management this weekend. The best *story* about cash management might be Phil Knight's memoir Shoe Dog.

  • COMPLEXITY

    M. Mitchell Waldrop

    A look at the rebellious thinkers who are challenging old ideas with their insights into the ways countless elements of complex systems interact to produce spontaneous order out of confusion

    Munger has recommended people read a book entitled Deep Simplicity: Bringing Order to Chaos and Complexity by John Gribbon. Bill Gurley recommends this book https://t.co/LpEddeYM9g You might also read https://t.co/ABJCJV8kUV Knowing what you don't or can't know is very valuable. https://t.co/2lcHtd6bTx

  • "It’s an interesting book, and, you know, selling tires, how do you make any money doing that?" Warren Buffett ~$25 used https://t.co/aiay1TLgfS

  • Korea in an era of growth

    Trenholme J Griffin

    @ScarrottKalani @Visage_1 @jmj I have written a book on Korea and Taiwan, but nothing specific yet on Japan. https://t.co/pZFBhB1VjN

  • Poor Charlie's Almanack

    Charles T. Munger

    @marty_wash 1. Poor Charlie's is a compilation of writing and speeches in the raw. 2. My book is a complete explanation of Charlie's system 3. Damn Right is a biography Each book is quite different.

  • Damn Right

    Janet Lowe

    Praise for Damn Right! From the author of the bestselling WARREN BUFFETT SPEAKS. . . "Charlie Munger, whose reputation is deep and wide, based on an extraordinary record of brilliantly successful business strategies, sees things that others don't. There is a method to his mastery and, through this book, we get a chance to learn about this rare individual." -MICHAEL EISNER, Chairman and CEO, The Walt Disney Company "Janet Lowe uncovers the iconoclastic genius and subtle charm behind Charlie Munger's curmudgeonly facade in this richly woven portrait of our era's heir to Ben Franklin. With a biographer's detachment, an historian's thoroughness, and a financial writer's common sense, Lowe produces a riveting account of the family, personal, and business life of the idiosyncratically complex and endlessly fascinating figure." -LAWRENCE CUNNINGHAM, Cardozo Law School, Author of The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America "For years, Berkshire Hathaway shareholders and investors worldwide (me included) have struggled to learn more about Warren Buffett's cerebral sidekick. Now we can rest and enjoy reading Janet Lowe's book about this rare intellectual jewel called Charlie Munger." -ROBERT G. HAGSTROM, Author of The Warren Buffett Way "Charlie has lived by the creed that one should live a life that doesn't need explaining. But his life should be explained. In a city where heroism is too often confused with celebrity, Charlie is a true hero and mentor. He lives the life lessons that he has studiously extracted from other true heroes and mentors, from Ben Franklin to Ben Graham. This book illuminates those life lessons." -RONALD L. OLSON, Munger, Tolles & Olson llp "Janet Lowe's unprecedented access to Charlie Munger and Warren Buffett has resulted in a first-class book that investors, academics, and CEOs will find entertaining and highly useful."-TIMOTHY P. VICK, Money Manager and Author of How to Pick Stocks Like Warren Buffett

    @marty_wash 1. Poor Charlie's is a compilation of writing and speeches in the raw. 2. My book is a complete explanation of Charlie's system 3. Damn Right is a biography Each book is quite different.

  • Money from Thin Air

    O. Casey Corr

    A portrait of visionary entrepreneur Craig McCaw discusses his seminal role in the development of the cellular communications industry and his latest work with Teledesic, a satellite network providing fast, economical worldwide Internet access. 20,000 first printing.

    @mgirdley It is not the book I would have written, but it is the only one that is available. T https://t.co/eltLynCCRy

  • Thirty-one short stories which provide a rich view of Maugham's prolific talent, wide-ranging vision, and engaging style.

    @RampCapitalLLC W. Somerset Maugham Collected Stories. https://t.co/K3QO2QO2Dx "The adventures of his alter ego Ashenden, a writer who (like Maugham himself) turned secret agent in World War I, as well as in stories set in such locales as South Pacific islands and colonial outposts in SE Asia." https://t.co/8eg2IwR4jA

  • 7 Powers

    Hamilton Helmer

    7 Powers details a strategy toolset that enables you to build an enduringly valuable company. It was developed by Hamilton Helmer drawing on his decades of experience as a strategy advisor, equity investor and Stanford University teacher. This is must reading for any business person and applies to all businesses, new or mature, large or small.

    1/ 25iQuiz: Can you name a business which typifies each of the "7 Powers" in the book of the same name? 1. Scale Economies 2. Network Economies 3. Counter-Positioning 4. Switching Costs 5. Branding 6. Cornered Resource 7. Process Power https://t.co/pdwHpWJhcb https://t.co/qxeP8iSG2M

  • GDP

    Diane Coyle

    Why did the size of the U.S. economy increase by 3 percent on one day in mid-2013—or Ghana's balloon by 60 percent overnight in 2010? Why did the U.K. financial industry show its fastest expansion ever at the end of 2008—just as the world’s financial system went into meltdown? And why was Greece’s chief statistician charged with treason in 2013 for apparently doing nothing more than trying to accurately report the size of his country’s economy? The answers to all these questions lie in the way we define and measure national economies around the world: Gross Domestic Product. This entertaining and informative book tells the story of GDP, making sense of a statistic that appears constantly in the news, business, and politics, and that seems to rule our lives—but that hardly anyone actually understands. Diane Coyle traces the history of this artificial, abstract, complex, but exceedingly important statistic from its eighteenth- and nineteenth-century precursors through its invention in the 1940s and its postwar golden age, and then through the Great Crash up to today. The reader learns why this standard measure of the size of a country’s economy was invented, how it has changed over the decades, and what its strengths and weaknesses are. The book explains why even small changes in GDP can decide elections, influence major political decisions, and determine whether countries can keep borrowing or be thrown into recession. The book ends by making the case that GDP was a good measure for the twentieth century but is increasingly inappropriate for a twenty-first-century economy driven by innovation, services, and intangible goods.

    @KyLaffoon If you have someone use GDP for what it isn't you get things like Lagarde saying low productivity to "be with us for a long time." Monetary economy excluding software, global supply chain isn't the economy https://t.co/fp2b7T77xf https://t.co/ykH78EcgBm https://t.co/egvC1HhFfv

  • More from Less

    Andrew McAfee

    From the coauthor of the New York Times bestseller The Second Machine Age, a compelling argument—masterfully researched and brilliantly articulated—that we have at last learned how to increase human prosperity while treading more lightly on our planet. Throughout history, the only way for humanity to grow was by degrading the Earth: chopping down forests, fouling the air and water, and endlessly digging out resources. Since the first Earth Day in 1970, the reigning argument has been that taking better care of the planet means radically changing course: reducing our consumption, tightening our belts, learning to share and reuse, restraining growth. Is that argument correct? Absolutely not. In More from Less, McAfee argues that to solve our ecological problems we don’t need to make radical changes. Instead, we need to do more of what we’re already doing: growing technologically sophisticated market-based economies around the world. How can he possibly make this claim? Because of the evidence. America—a large, high-tech country that accounts for about 25% of the global economy—is now generally using less of most resources year after year, even as its economy and population continue to grow. What’s more, the US is polluting the air and water less, emitting fewer greenhouse gases, and replenishing endangered animal populations. And, as McAfee shows, America is not alone. Other countries are also transforming themselves in fundamental ways. What has made this turnabout possible? One thing, primarily: the collaboration between technology and capitalism, although good governance and public awareness have also been critical. McAfee does warn of issues that haven’t been solved, like global warming, overfishing, and communities left behind as capitalism and tech progress race forward. But overall, More from Less is a revelatory, paradigm-shifting account of how we’ve stumbled into an unexpectedly better balance with nature—one that holds out the promise of more abundant and greener centuries ahead.

    @KyLaffoon If you have someone use GDP for what it isn't you get things like Lagarde saying low productivity to "be with us for a long time." Monetary economy excluding software, global supply chain isn't the economy https://t.co/fp2b7T77xf https://t.co/ykH78EcgBm https://t.co/egvC1HhFfv

  • Charlie Munger

    Tren Griffin

    This book presents the essential steps of Charlie Munger's investing strategy, condensed from interviews, speeches, writings, and shareholder letters and paired with commentary from fund managers, value investors, and business-case historians. Munger's approach is straightforward enough that ordinary investors can apply it to their portfolios.

    3/ When I was writing my Charlie Munger book https://t.co/PKL8ZcVyKQ I wanted the book to be funnier to make it easier to read. I asked a few people whether I should include a few jokes and they said "no." I included the jokes anyway. A book is personal. Write what *you* want.

  • A Dozen Lessons for Entrepreneurs shows how the insights of leading venture capitalists can teach readers to create a unique approach to building a successful business. By better understanding the views and experiences of a wide range of entrepreneurs, readers can discern which of many possible paths will lead to success.

    @pitdesi @micahjay1 I've written about many investors working at all stages and see themes but also see variations on those themes. I write about 37 venture capital investors in my book https://t.co/sQuRjtGtJn and there are more on https://t.co/9ecXnywrjR. I'm sure your style works for you.

  • Aza Holmes, a high school student with obsessive-compulsive disorder, becomes focused on searching for a fugitive billionaire.

    @fxshaw @matvelloso The problem of infinite regress. https://t.co/4BvtZXDWB7

  • Bestselling author and veteran Wall Street Journal reporter Zuckerman answers the question investors have been asking for decades: How did Jim Simons do it? Simons is the greatest money maker in modern financial history. His track record bests those of legendary investors including Warren Buffett, Peter Lynch, Ray Dalio, and George Soros..

    I just finished the new book on Jim Simons (The Man Who Solved the Market). It is quite a good story and well written. If you expect to learn very much new about how the Renaissance system works, you will likely be disappointed. My 25iQ post on that is: https://t.co/sbchvhnR1b

  • Charlie Munger

    Tren Griffin

    @asinghtoo https://t.co/HghQCVjDPF

  • More from Less

    Andrew McAfee

    From the coauthor of the New York Times bestseller The Second Machine Age, a paradigm-shifting argument “full of fascinating information and provocative insights” (Publishers Weekly, starred review)—demonstrating that we are increasing prosperity while using fewer natural resources. Throughout history, the only way for humanity to grow was by degrading the Earth: chopping down forests, polluting the air and water, and endlessly using up resources. Since the first Earth Day in 1970, the focus has been on radically changing course: reducing our consumption, tightening our belts, and learning to share and reuse. Is that argument correct? Absolutely not. In More from Less, McAfee argues that to solve our ecological problems we should do the opposite of what a decade of conventional wisdom suggests. Rather than reduce and conserve, we should rely on the cost-consciousness built into capitalism and the streamlining miracles of technology to create a more efficient world. America—a large, high-tech country that accounts for about 25% of the global economy—is now generally using less of most resources year after year, even as its economy and population continue to grow. What’s more, the US is polluting the air and water less, emitting fewer greenhouse gases, and replenishing endangered animal populations. And, as McAfee shows, America is not alone. Other countries are also transforming themselves in fundamental ways. What has made this turnabout possible? One thing, primarily: the collaboration between technology and capitalism, although good governance and public awareness have also been critical. McAfee does warn of issues that haven’t been solved, like global warming, overfishing, and communities left behind as capitalism and tech progress race forward. But overall, More from Less is a revelatory and “deeply engaging” (Booklist) account of how we’ve stumbled into an unexpectedly better balance with nature—one that holds out the promise of more abundant and greener centuries ahead.

    @TheStalwart @amcafee"More from Less: The Surprising Story of How We Learned to Prosper Using Fewer Resources―and What Happens Next" https://t.co/7QzubDrn1X