Carlos E. Perez

Carlos E. Perez

Follows you - Meta-Physics of General Intelligence. Human aligned decentralization. https://t.co/hvGgkhYsSU https://t.co/OIaYbY1gdL… #deeplearning #ai

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90+ Book Recommendations by Carlos E. Perez

  • Artificial Intuition

    Carlos E Perez

    I challenge you to find a field as interesting and exciting as Deep Learning. This book is a spin-off from my previous book "The Deep Learning AI Playbook." The Playbook was meant for a professional audience. This is targeted to a much wider audience. There are two kinds of audiences, those looking to explore and those looking to optimize. There are two ways to learn, learning by exploration and learning by exploitation. This book is about exploration into the emerging field of Deep Learning. It's more like a popular science book and less of a business book. It's not going to provide any practical advice of how to use or deploy Deep Learning. However, it's a book that will explore this new field in many more perspectives. So at the very least, you'll walk away with the ability to hold a very informative and impressive conversation about this unique subject. It's my hope that having less constraints on what I can express can lead to a more insightful and novel book. There are plenty of ideas that are either too general or too speculative to fit within a business oriented book. With a business book, you always want to manage expectations. Artificial Intelligence is one of those topics that you want to keep speaking in a conservative manner. That's one reason I felt the need for this book. Perhaps the freedom to be more liberal can give readers more ideas as where this field is heading. Also, it's not just business that needs to understand Deep Learning. We are all going to be profoundly impacted by this new kind of Artificial Intelligence and it is critical we all develop at least a good intuition of how it will change the world.The images in the front cover are all generated using Deep Learning technology.

    @JohnDobbin Nice wording of a queston. Yes we do. https://t.co/bOBUOzAwmG

  • Artificial Intuition

    Carlos E Perez

    I challenge you to find a field as interesting and exciting as Deep Learning. This book is a spin-off from my previous book "The Deep Learning AI Playbook." The Playbook was meant for a professional audience. This is targeted to a much wider audience. There are two kinds of audiences, those looking to explore and those looking to optimize. There are two ways to learn, learning by exploration and learning by exploitation. This book is about exploration into the emerging field of Deep Learning. It's more like a popular science book and less of a business book. It's not going to provide any practical advice of how to use or deploy Deep Learning. However, it's a book that will explore this new field in many more perspectives. So at the very least, you'll walk away with the ability to hold a very informative and impressive conversation about this unique subject. It's my hope that having less constraints on what I can express can lead to a more insightful and novel book. There are plenty of ideas that are either too general or too speculative to fit within a business oriented book. With a business book, you always want to manage expectations. Artificial Intelligence is one of those topics that you want to keep speaking in a conservative manner. That's one reason I felt the need for this book. Perhaps the freedom to be more liberal can give readers more ideas as where this field is heading. Also, it's not just business that needs to understand Deep Learning. We are all going to be profoundly impacted by this new kind of Artificial Intelligence and it is critical we all develop at least a good intuition of how it will change the world.The images in the front cover are all generated using Deep Learning technology.

    @MakingmyselfMkm We are Intuition Machines. https://t.co/wwMVje4v0r

  • To understand how to apply Deep Learning, read my book that I wrote in 2017. https://t.co/CxuR3D0Ywp

  • @robinhanson The Evolution of Beauty might be a good book that relates to this.

  • A Pattern Language

    Christopher Alexander

    Christopher Alexander noticed that the complexities of expressing tacit architectural decisions. He realized that we can improve our designs by systematically formulating our tacit knowledge into new expressions. He called this pattern languages. https://t.co/pzxV1SuI3m

  • The Sum of Us

    Heather McGhee

    "Heather C. McGhee's specialty is the American economy--and the mystery of why it so often fails the American public. As she dug into subject after subject, from the financial crisis to declining wages to collapsing public infrastructure, she found a common problem at the bottom of them all: racism--but not just in the obvious ways that hurt people of color. Racism has costs for white people, too. It's the common denominator in our most vexing public problems, even beyond our economy. It is at the core of the dysfunction of our democracy and even the spiritual and moral crises that grip us. Racism is a toxin in the American body and it weakens us all. But how did this happen? And is there a way out? To find the way, McGhee embarks on a deeply personal journey across the country from Mississippi to Maine, tallying up what we lose when we buy into the zero-sum paradigm--the idea that progress for some of us must come at the expense of others. Along the way, she collects the stories of white people who confide in her about losing their homes, their dreams and their shot at a better job to the toxic mix of American racism and greed. This is the story of how public goods in this country--from parks and pools to functioning schools--have become private luxuries; of how unions collapsed, wages stagnated, and inequality increased; and of how this country, unique among the world's advanced economies, has thwarted universal healthcare. It's why we fail to prevent environmental and public health crises that require collective action. But in unlikely places of worship and work, McGhee also finds proof of what she calls the Solidarity Dividend: gains that come when people come together across race, to the benefit of all involved"--

    This mirrors the draining of the public pools. Many places in the USA favored draining and closing down their public pools over the possibility of races mixing together and enjoying the benefits of the pool. https://t.co/Olg0BfQmCz

  • Atlas of AI

    Kate Crawford

    The hidden costs of artificial intelligence, from natural resources and labor to privacy and freedom What happens when artificial intelligence saturates political life and depletes the planet? How is AI shaping our understanding of ourselves and our societies? In this book Kate Crawford reveals how this planetary network is fueling a shift toward undemocratic governance and increased inequality. Drawing on more than a decade of research, award-winning science, and technology, Crawford reveals how AI is a technology of extraction: from the energy and minerals needed to build and sustain its infrastructure, to the exploited workers behind "automated" services, to the data AI collects from us. Rather than taking a narrow focus on code and algorithms, Crawford offers us a political and a material perspective on what it takes to make artificial intelligence and where it goes wrong. While technical systems present a veneer of objectivity, they are always systems of power. This is an urgent account of what is at stake as technology companies use artificial intelligence to reshape the world.

    Kate Crawford @katecrawford has an insightful book 'The Altas of AI' which examines in great detail the extent of exploitation that makes possible the knowledge and information economy that we live in. https://t.co/2ySLoKUfvW

  • LAWS, LANGUAGE and LIFE

    Howard Hunt Pattee

    Howard Pattee is a physicist who for many years has taken his own path in studying the physics of symbols, which is now a foundation for biosemiotics. By extending von Neumann’s logical requirements for self-replication, to the physical requirements of symbolic instruction at the molecular level, he concludes that a form of quantum measurement is necessary for life. He explains why all non-dynamic symbolic and informational controls act as special (allosteric) constraints on dynamical systems. Pattee also points out that symbols do not exist in isolation but in coordinated symbol systems we call languages. Such insights turn out to be necessary to situate biosemiotics as an objective scientific endeavor. By proposing a way to relate quiescent symbolic constraints to dynamics, Pattee’s work builds a bridge between physical, biological, and psychological models that are based on dynamical systems theory. Pattee’s work awakes new interest in cognitive scientists, where his recognition of the necessary separation—the epistemic cut—between the subject and object provides a basis for a complementary third way of relating the purely symbolic, computational models of cognition and the purely dynamic, non-representational models. This selection of Pattee’s papers also addresses several other fields, including hierarchy theory, artificial life, self-organization, complexity theory, and the complementary epistemologies of the physical and biological sciences.

    @okw @GaneshNatesh So there's a 'phase transition' between life and non-life and its artifact is DNA. It's not a continuum. I suggest further reading: https://t.co/wxH1GK5TLY

  • “More than anything else technology creates our world. It creates our wealth, our economy, our very way of being,” says W. Brian Arthur. Yet despite technology’s irrefutable importance in our daily lives, until now its major questions have gone unanswered. Where do new technologies come from? What constitutes innovation, and how is it achieved? Does technology, like biological life, evolve? In this groundbreaking work, pioneering technology thinker and economist W. Brian Arthur answers these questions and more, setting forth a boldly original way of thinking about technology. The Nature of Technology is an elegant and powerful theory of technology’s origins and evolution. Achieving for the development of technology what Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions did for scientific progress, Arthur explains how transformative new technologies arise and how innovation really works. Drawing on a wealth of examples, from historical inventions to the high-tech wonders of today, Arthur takes us on a mind-opening journey that will change the way we think about technology and how it structures our lives. The Nature of Technology is a classic for our times.

    @ole_b_peters A good book to read in Arthur's 'The Nature of Technology'. Technology progress is always initially tied to existing legacy technologies. It doesn't magically replace everything in an instant.

  • LAWS, LANGUAGE and LIFE

    Howard Hunt Pattee

    Howard Pattee is a physicist who for many years has taken his own path in studying the physics of symbols, which is now a foundation for biosemiotics. By extending von Neumann’s logical requirements for self-replication, to the physical requirements of symbolic instruction at the molecular level, he concludes that a form of quantum measurement is necessary for life. He explains why all non-dynamic symbolic and informational controls act as special (allosteric) constraints on dynamical systems. Pattee also points out that symbols do not exist in isolation but in coordinated symbol systems we call languages. Such insights turn out to be necessary to situate biosemiotics as an objective scientific endeavor. By proposing a way to relate quiescent symbolic constraints to dynamics, Pattee’s work builds a bridge between physical, biological, and psychological models that are based on dynamical systems theory. Pattee’s work awakes new interest in cognitive scientists, where his recognition of the necessary separation—the epistemic cut—between the subject and object provides a basis for a complementary third way of relating the purely symbolic, computational models of cognition and the purely dynamic, non-representational models. This selection of Pattee’s papers also addresses several other fields, including hierarchy theory, artificial life, self-organization, complexity theory, and the complementary epistemologies of the physical and biological sciences.

    But to break out of the contradiction between physics and biology, one has to read Howard Pattee. Pattee is originally a physicist, so the way he frames his derivation of biology is from a perspective that makes sense to me. You can find his ideas here: https://t.co/EzsnVB6cUB

  • How We Learn

    Stanislas Dehaene

    I just read two interesting books about brains "How We Learn" by Dehaene and "Metazoa" by Godfrey-Smith. I am surprised to find that Grothendieck is described in both books. I've only heard of the name in passing, so I'm definitely missing something! https://t.co/dhrGno63By

  • Metazoa

    Peter Godfrey-Smith

    The scuba-diving philosopher who wrote Other Minds explores the origins of animal consciousness In his acclaimed 2016 book Other Minds, the philosopher and scuba diver Peter Godfrey-Smith explored the mind of the octopus—the closest thing to an intelligent alien on earth, as he put it. In Metazoa, Godfrey-Smith expands his inquiry to animals at large, investigating the evolution of subjective awareness with the assistance of the far flung species he has met undersea. Combining vivid animal encounters with philosophical reflections and the latest news from biology, Metazoa reveals that even in our hi-tech, AI-driven times, there is no understanding minds without understanding nerves, muscles, and our active bodies. The result is a story as rich and vibrant as life itself, one that explains the mystery of animal consciousness in accessible and riveting prose.

    I just read two interesting books about brains "How We Learn" by Dehaene and "Metazoa" by Godfrey-Smith. I am surprised to find that Grothendieck is described in both books. I've only heard of the name in passing, so I'm definitely missing something! https://t.co/dhrGno63By

  • A FINALIST FOR THE PULITZER PRIZE NAMED A BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR BY THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, SMITHSONIAN, AND WALL STREET JOURNAL A major reimagining of how evolutionary forces work, revealing how mating preferences—what Darwin termed "the taste for the beautiful"—create the extraordinary range of ornament in the animal world. In the great halls of science, dogma holds that Darwin's theory of natural selection explains every branch on the tree of life: which species thrive, which wither away to extinction, and what features each evolves. But can adaptation by natural selection really account for everything we see in nature? Yale University ornithologist Richard Prum—reviving Darwin's own views—thinks not. Deep in tropical jungles around the world are birds with a dizzying array of appearances and mating displays: Club-winged Manakins who sing with their wings, Great Argus Pheasants who dazzle prospective mates with a four-foot-wide cone of feathers covered in golden 3D spheres, Red-capped Manakins who moonwalk. In thirty years of fieldwork, Prum has seen numerous display traits that seem disconnected from, if not outright contrary to, selection for individual survival. To explain this, he dusts off Darwin's long-neglected theory of sexual selection in which the act of choosing a mate for purely aesthetic reasons—for the mere pleasure of it—is an independent engine of evolutionary change. Mate choice can drive ornamental traits from the constraints of adaptive evolution, allowing them to grow ever more elaborate. It also sets the stakes for sexual conflict, in which the sexual autonomy of the female evolves in response to male sexual control. Most crucially, this framework provides important insights into the evolution of human sexuality, particularly the ways in which female preferences have changed male bodies, and even maleness itself, through evolutionary time. The Evolution of Beauty presents a unique scientific vision for how nature's splendor contributes to a more complete understanding of evolution and of ourselves.

    Stumbled upon chance this book 'The Evolution of Beauty. Here's a lecture by the author. Appears the beauty is an emergent property of choice. https://t.co/y6eJN4WqSO

  • On this tour of the universe of signs, Jesper Hoffmeyer travels back to the Big Bang, visits the tiniest places deep within cells, and ends his journey with us - complex organisms capable of speech and reason. He shows that life at its most basic depends on the survival of messages written in the code of DNA molecules, and on the tiny cell - the fertilized egg - that must interpret the message and from it construct an organism. What propels this journey is Hoffmeyer's attempt to discover how nature could come to mean something to someone; indeed, how "something" could become "someone." How could a biological self become a semiotic self?

    @DrYohanJohn If you want an even shorter book, this one I also liked: https://t.co/RDR1T3TV50

  • Biosemiotics

    Jesper Hoffmeyer

    Recent debates surrounding the teaching of biology divide participants into three camps based on how they explain the appearance of the human race: evolution, creationism, or intelligent design. Biosemiotics discovers an intriguing higher ground respecting those opposing theories by arguing that questions of meaning and experiential life can be integrated into the scientific study of nature. This groundbreaking book shows how the linguistic powers of humans imply that consciousness emerges in the evolutionary process and that life is based on sign action, not just molecular interaction. Biosemiotics will be essential reading for anyone interested in the nexus of linguistic possibility and biological reality.

    @DrYohanJohn https://t.co/ymhsK8a2tN

  • @leonardkish @TexPine Indeed. Please read my book "Artificial Intuition". https://t.co/9rO3RZXyqr

  • Very few are aware that there exists a Feynman Lectures on Computation: https://t.co/FS8N3MG2FO

  • Scale

    Geoffrey West

    Geoffrey West in his investigation of scale began with the question of why do organisms as ourselves die. He argues that one can not completely understand biology by ignoring death. https://t.co/PMmGUcvUr9

  • Radical Markets

    Eric A. Posner

    Revolutionary ideas on how to use markets to bring about fairness and prosperity for all Many blame today's economic inequality, stagnation, and political instability on the free market. The solution is to rein in the market, right? Radical Markets turns this thinking—and pretty much all conventional thinking about markets, both for and against—on its head. The book reveals bold new ways to organize markets for the good of everyone. It shows how the emancipatory force of genuinely open, free, and competitive markets can reawaken the dormant nineteenth-century spirit of liberal reform and lead to greater equality, prosperity, and cooperation. Eric Posner and Glen Weyl demonstrate why private property is inherently monopolistic, and how we would all be better off if private ownership were converted into a public auction for public benefit. They show how the principle of one person, one vote inhibits democracy, suggesting instead an ingenious way for voters to effectively influence the issues that matter most to them. They argue that every citizen of a host country should benefit from immigration—not just migrants and their capitalist employers. They propose leveraging antitrust laws to liberate markets from the grip of institutional investors and creating a data labor movement to force digital monopolies to compensate people for their electronic data. Only by radically expanding the scope of markets can we reduce inequality, restore robust economic growth, and resolve political conflicts. But to do that, we must replace our most sacred institutions with truly free and open competition—Radical Markets shows how.

    I first learned about quadratic voting in that wonderful book "radical markets". A must-read for anyone who wants to refactor civilization.

  • How We Learn

    Stanislas Dehaene

    Stanislas Dehaene in his book How We Learn describes four pillars of learning. https://t.co/7kqfjAOuuH

  • IMHO, if you don't understand intuition and its relationship to deep learning, then you aren't on the right path. https://t.co/MLjweGTGjc

  • Forging provocative connections among many fields, the author of Art and Physics demonstrates how alphabetic literacy caused the development of the brain's left half over the right, which affected the role and power of women. Reprint. Tour.

    @ETagliazucchi @KordingLab @WiringTheBrain @tyrell_turing Another book that I found interesting is Shlain's Goddess and the Alphabet. This is more about history but it revolves also around the same dichotomy: https://t.co/IBybi6Sbau

  • Radical Markets

    Eric A. Posner

    This reminds me, Radical Markets is loaded with innovative ideas: https://t.co/2vHkILnodF

  • Forging provocative connections among many fields, the author of Art and Physics demonstrates how alphabetic literacy caused the development of the brain's left half over the right, which affected the role and power of women. Reprint. Tour.

    @personalitygeni Yes, thoughts do not require an expression in language. The book 'The Alphabet and the Goddess' examines the historical competition between language and empathy.

  • The Luminous Ground

    Christopher Alexander

    Christopher Alexander, an architect, who wrote 'A Pattern Language' that has immensely influenced software development, wrote four books exploring this idea (see: Nature of Order).

  • Kahneman's book 'Thinking Fast and Slow' that is meant for a popular audience if virtually unknown by most people. I did not know of it until I tried to attempt an understanding of Deep Learning technology.

  • Catching Ourselves in the Act

    Horst Hendriks-Jansen

    Catching Ourselves in the Act uses situated robotics, ethology, and developmental psychology to erect a new framework for explaining human behavior. Rejecting the cognitive science orthodoxy that formal task-descriptions and their implementation are fundamental to an explanation of mind, Horst Hendriks-Jansen argues for an alternative model based on the notion of interactive emergence. Situated activity and interactive emergence are concepts that derive from the new discipline of autonomous agent research. Hendriks-Jansen puts these notions on a firm philosophical basis and uses them to anchor a "genetic" or "historical" explanation of mental phenomena in species-typical activity patterns that have been selected by a cultural environment of artifacts, language, and intentional scaffolding by adults. Situated robotics, allied with techniques and principles from ethology, allows the testing of hypotheses framed in terms of natural kinds that can be grounded through the theory of natural selection. This approach negotiates the "nature versus nurture" dispute in a radically new way. Catching Ourselves in the Act provides a thorough overview of autonomous agent research in America and Europe, focusing in particular on work by such eminent researchers as Rodney Brooks, Pattie Maes, Maja Mataric, and Rolf Pfeifer. It reassesses the basic principles of artificial life and explores the repercussions of autonomous agent research for human psychology and the philosophy of mind, as well as its affinities with the "contextual revolution" in sociology and anthropology. A Bradford Book. Complex Adaptive Systems

    Interactive Emergence is a neologism that Horst Hendriks-Jensen uses in his book Catching Ourselves in the Act. https://t.co/JvX0Eilkw9

  • The Luminous Ground

    Christopher Alexander

    Almost everyone involved in software architecture knows of Christopher Alexander's book "A Pattern Language". However, few know of his later writings "The Nature of Order".

  • A unified derivation of physics from Fisher information, giving new insights into physical phenomena.

    @FroehlichMarcel @sir_deenicus @GaneshNatesh @_fernando_rosas This is the book: https://t.co/H0vSl2qEZ7

  • My journey into my explorations into general intelligence began with my book 'Artificial Intuition'. https://t.co/kg4BdMlOWP

  • From the author of How Emotions Are Made, a myth-busting primer on the brain in the tradition of Seven Brief Lessons on Physics and Astrophysics for People in a Hurry. Have you ever wondered why you have a brain? Let renowned neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett demystify that big gray blob between your ears. In seven short essays (plus a bite-sized story about how brains evolved), this slim, entertaining, and accessible collection reveals mind-expanding lessons from the front lines of neuroscience research. You'll learn where brains came from, how they're structured (and why it matters), and how yours works in tandem with other brains to create everything you experience. Along the way, you'll also learn to dismiss popular myths such as the idea of a "lizard brain" and the alleged battle between thoughts and emotions, or even between nature and nurture, to determine your behavior. Sure to intrigue casual readers and scientific veterans alike, Seven and a Half Lessons About the Brain is full of surprises, humor, and important implications for human nature--a gift of a book that you will want to savor again and again.

    Seven and a Half Lessons about the brain is a short insightful book that points out the many misconceptions the general audience has about the brain. @LFeldmanBarrett https://t.co/nPSijnj3m5

  • Other Minds

    Peter Godfrey-Smith

    Enjoyed his book OTHER MINDS about octopuses. Looking forward to this! https://t.co/4qpmF4cOe9

  • Surfaces and Essences

    Douglas Hofstadter

    Shows how analogy-making pervades human thought at all levels, influencing the choice of words and phrases in speech, providing guidance in unfamiliar situations, and giving rise to great acts of imagination.

    @FroehlichMarcel @coecke @LimDonghunk Hofstadter's book is a unique treatment of categories: https://t.co/Lomb9Aav01

  • The major principles and systems of C. S. Peirce's ground-breaking theory of signs and signification are now generally well known. Less well known, however, is the fact that Peirce initially conceived these systems within a 'Philosophy of Representation', his latter-day version of the traditional grammar, logic and rhetoric trivium. In this book, Tony Jappy traces the evolution of Peirce's Philosophy of Representation project and examines the sign systems which came to supersede it. Surveying the stages in Peirce's break with this Philosophy of Representation from its beginnings in the mid-1860s to his final statements on signs between 1908 and 1911, this book draws out the essential theoretical differences between the earlier and later sign systems. Although the 1903 ten-class system has been extensively researched by scholars, this book is the first to exploit the untapped potential of the later six-element systems. Showing how these systems differ from the 1903 version, Peirce's Twenty-Eight Classes of Signs and the Philosophy of Representation offers an innovative and valuable reinterpretation of Peirce's thinking on signs and representation. Exploring the potential of the later sign-systems that Peirce scholars have hitherto been reluctant to engage with and extending Peirce's semiotic theory beyond the much canvassed systems of his Philosophy of Representation, this book will be essential reading for everyone working in the field of semiotics.

    @rplevy @PsychScientists @LimDonghunk @vanbettauer @NoahGuzman14 Here's an available book that sheds more light on this: https://t.co/LYaowX2MrU

  • Rhythms of the Brain

    Gyorgy Buzsaki

    @markburgess_osl @purpleidea @elonmusk But if you want to know more about rhythms and brains then this I think is where you should start: https://t.co/RT41LymrQd

  • The Inevitable

    Kevin Kelly

    It's 2046. You don't own a car, or much of anything else, instead subscribing to items as you need them. Virtual reality is as commonplace as cell phones. You talk to your devices with hand gestures. Practically all surfaces have become a screen, and each screen watches you back. Robots and AI took over your old job but also created a new one for you, work you could not have imagined back in 2016. In The Inevitable, Kevin Kelly, the visionary thinker who foresaw the scope of the internet revolution, provides a plausible, optimistic road map for the next 30 years. He shows how the coming changes can be understood as the result of a few long-term forces that are already in motion. Kelly both describes these 12 deep trends-including cognifying our surroundings, valuing access over ownership, tracking everything-and demonstrates how they are codependent on one another. These larger forces will completely revolutionize the way we work, play, learn, buy, and communicate with each other. Ultimately, predicts Kelly, all humans and machines will be linked up into a global matrix, a convergence that will be seen as the largest, most complex, and most surprising event ever up to this time. The Inevitablewill be indispensable to anyone who seeks guidance on where to position themselves as this new world emerge.

    @neuro_data @KordingLab @criticalneuro @danilobzdok @DLBarack @tyrell_turing @BWJones @fchollet @Everyone But if you are trying to make sense of this world, then @kevin2kelly is the go to book: The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future

  • Wayfinding

    M. R. O'Connor

    At once far flung and intimate, a fascinating look at how finding our way make us human. In this compelling narrative, O'Connor seeks out neuroscientists, anthropologists and master navigators to understand how navigation ultimately gave us our humanity. Biologists have been trying to solve the mystery of how organisms have the ability to migrate and orient with such precision—especially since our own adventurous ancestors spread across the world without maps or instruments. O'Connor goes to the Arctic, the Australian bush and the South Pacific to talk to masters of their environment who seek to preserve their traditions at a time when anyone can use a GPS to navigate. O’Connor explores the neurological basis of spatial orientation within the hippocampus. Without it, people inhabit a dream state, becoming amnesiacs incapable of finding their way, recalling the past, or imagining the future. Studies have shown that the more we exercise our cognitive mapping skills, the greater the grey matter and health of our hippocampus. O'Connor talks to scientists studying how atrophy in the hippocampus is associated with afflictions such as impaired memory, dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease, depression and PTSD. Wayfinding is a captivating book that charts how our species' profound capacity for exploration, memory and storytelling results in topophilia, the love of place. "O'Connor talked to just the right people in just the right places, and her narrative is a marvel of storytelling on its own merits, erudite but lightly worn. There are many reasons why people should make efforts to improve their geographical literacy, and O'Connor hits on many in this excellent book—devouring it makes for a good start." —Kirkus Reviews

    @neuro_data @KordingLab @criticalneuro @danilobzdok @DLBarack @tyrell_turing @BWJones @fchollet @Everyone For vacation and something that will stimulate your mind about machine learning? I got the perfect book: Wayfinding: The Science and Mystery of How Humans Navigate the World

  • The Luminous Ground

    Christopher Alexander

    This is a book that begins with his ideas and the subsequent refinement of his ideas from the likes of David Bohm and Christopher Alexander. This is a book about how general intelligence arises from a simple idea.

  • How We Learn

    Stanislas Dehaene

    "In today's technological society, with an unprecedented amount of information at our fingertips, learning plays a more central role than ever. In How We Learn, Stanislas Dehaene decodes its biological mechanisms, delving into the neuronal, synaptic, and molecular processes taking place in the brain. He explains why youth is such a sensitive period, during which brain plasticity is maximal, but also assures us that our abilities continue into adulthood, and that we can enhance our learning and memory at any age. We can all "learn to learn" by taking maximal advantage of the four pillars of the brain's learning algorithm: attention, active engagement, error feedback, and consolidation. The human brain is an extraordinary machine. Its ability to process information and adapt to circumstances by reprogramming itself is unparalleled, and it remains the best source of inspiration for recent developments in artificial intelligence. The exciting advancements in A.I. of the last twenty years reveal just as much about our remarkable abilities as they do about the potential of machines. How We Learn finds the boundary of computer science, neurobiology, and cognitive psychology to explain how learning really works and how to make the best use of the brain's learning algorithms, in our schools and universities as well as in everyday life"--

    @peremayol @SubutaiAhmad @dileeplearning https://t.co/xBT0lFT4Hg

  • This book constitutes the first treatment of C. S. Peirce’s unique concept of habit. Habit animated the pragmatists of the 19th and early 20th centuries, who picked up the baton from classical scholars, principally Aristotle. Most prominent among the pragmatists thereafter is Charles Sanders Peirce. In our vernacular, habit connotes a pattern of conduct. Nonetheless, Peirce’s concept transcends application to mere regularity or to human conduct; it extends into natural and social phenomena, making cohesive inner and outer worlds. Chapters in this anthology define and amplify Peircean habit; as such, they highlight the dialectic between doubt and belief. Doubt destabilizes habit, leaving open the possibility for new beliefs in the form of habit-change; and without habit-change, the regularity would fall short of habit – conforming to automatic/mechanistic systems. This treatment of habit showcases how, through human agency, innovative regularities of behavior and thought advance the process of making the unconscious conscious. The latter materializes when affordances (invariant habits of physical phenomena) form the basis for modifications in action schemas and modes of reasoning. Further, the book charts how indexical signs in language and action are pivotal in establishing attentional patterns; and how these habits accommodate novel orientations within event templates. It is intended for those interested in Peirce’s metaphysic or semiotic, including both senior scholars and students of philosophy and religion, psychology, sociology and anthropology, as well as mathematics, and the natural sciences.

    @rplevy @prathyvsh @vanbettauer Speaking about Peirce's ideas on habit, there apparently is a book that ties his idea with affordances. https://t.co/p3W8wBkrGF

  • Surfaces and Essences

    Douglas Hofstadter

    Shows how analogy-making pervades human thought at all levels, influencing the choice of words and phrases in speech, providing guidance in unfamiliar situations, and giving rise to great acts of imagination.

    @bnielson01 I suggest reading Hofstadter's book to understand Analogy making: https://t.co/DbNaioxEr8

  • An argument that—despite dramatic advances in the field—artificial intelligence is nowhere near developing systems that are genuinely intelligent. In this provocative book, Brian Cantwell Smith argues that artificial intelligence is nowhere near developing systems that are genuinely intelligent. Second wave AI, machine learning, even visions of third-wave AI: none will lead to human-level intelligence and judgment, which have been honed over millennia. Recent advances in AI may be of epochal significance, but human intelligence is of a different order than even the most powerful calculative ability enabled by new computational capacities. Smith calls this AI ability “reckoning,” and argues that it does not lead to full human judgment—dispassionate, deliberative thought grounded in ethical commitment and responsible action. Taking judgment as the ultimate goal of intelligence, Smith examines the history of AI from its first-wave origins (“good old-fashioned AI,” or GOFAI) to such celebrated second-wave approaches as machine learning, paying particular attention to recent advances that have led to excitement, anxiety, and debate. He considers each AI technology's underlying assumptions, the conceptions of intelligence targeted at each stage, and the successes achieved so far. Smith unpacks the notion of intelligence itself—what sort humans have, and what sort AI aims at. Smith worries that, impressed by AI's reckoning prowess, we will shift our expectations of human intelligence. What we should do, he argues, is learn to use AI for the reckoning tasks at which it excels while we strengthen our commitment to judgment, ethics, and the world.

    Brian Cantwell-Smith's short book explains the limits of current AI well. I do recommend everyone in the field read it. https://t.co/GLQ3c1mUIg

  • Surfaces and Essences

    Douglas Hofstadter

    Shows how analogy-making pervades human thought at all levels, influencing the choice of words and phrases in speech, providing guidance in unfamiliar situations, and giving rise to great acts of imagination.

    @markcannon5 Read Hofstadter to see how abstractions relate to thinking. https://t.co/Lomb9Aav01

  • An argument that—despite dramatic advances in the field—artificial intelligence is nowhere near developing systems that are genuinely intelligent. In this provocative book, Brian Cantwell Smith argues that artificial intelligence is nowhere near developing systems that are genuinely intelligent. Second wave AI, machine learning, even visions of third-wave AI: none will lead to human-level intelligence and judgment, which have been honed over millennia. Recent advances in AI may be of epochal significance, but human intelligence is of a different order than even the most powerful calculative ability enabled by new computational capacities. Smith calls this AI ability “reckoning,” and argues that it does not lead to full human judgment—dispassionate, deliberative thought grounded in ethical commitment and responsible action. Taking judgment as the ultimate goal of intelligence, Smith examines the history of AI from its first-wave origins (“good old-fashioned AI,” or GOFAI) to such celebrated second-wave approaches as machine learning, paying particular attention to recent advances that have led to excitement, anxiety, and debate. He considers each AI technology's underlying assumptions, the conceptions of intelligence targeted at each stage, and the successes achieved so far. Smith unpacks the notion of intelligence itself—what sort humans have, and what sort AI aims at. Smith worries that, impressed by AI's reckoning prowess, we will shift our expectations of human intelligence. What we should do, he argues, is learn to use AI for the reckoning tasks at which it excels while we strengthen our commitment to judgment, ethics, and the world.

    @rtk254 @zacharylipton @MelMitchell1 Best book out there that makes clear the scope of AGI.

  • The Madness of Crowds

    Douglas Murray

    @pwang https://t.co/lZsT7razQo

  • It has been the opinion of many that Wiener will be remembered for his Extrapolation long after Cybernetics is forgotten. Indeed few computer-science students would know today what cybernetics is all about, while every communication student knows what Wiener's filter is. The work was circulated as a classified memorandum in 1942, as it was connected with sensitive war-time efforts to improve radar communication. This book became the basis for modern communication theory, by a scientist considered one of the founders of the field of artifical intelligence. Combining ideas from statistics and time-series analysis, Wiener used Gauss's method of shaping the characteristic of a detector to allow for the maximal recognition of signals in the presence of noise. This method came to be known as the "Wiener filter."

    @markburgess_osl Perhaps you might want to read Wiener's book that was actually classified at the time but served as Shannon's inspiration. https://t.co/iI8XeNWfcJ

  • An argument that—despite dramatic advances in the field—artificial intelligence is nowhere near developing systems that are genuinely intelligent. In this provocative book, Brian Cantwell Smith argues that artificial intelligence is nowhere near developing systems that are genuinely intelligent. Second wave AI, machine learning, even visions of third-wave AI: none will lead to human-level intelligence and judgment, which have been honed over millennia. Recent advances in AI may be of epochal significance, but human intelligence is of a different order than even the most powerful calculative ability enabled by new computational capacities. Smith calls this AI ability “reckoning,” and argues that it does not lead to full human judgment—dispassionate, deliberative thought grounded in ethical commitment and responsible action. Taking judgment as the ultimate goal of intelligence, Smith examines the history of AI from its first-wave origins (“good old-fashioned AI,” or GOFAI) to such celebrated second-wave approaches as machine learning, paying particular attention to recent advances that have led to excitement, anxiety, and debate. He considers each AI technology's underlying assumptions, the conceptions of intelligence targeted at each stage, and the successes achieved so far. Smith unpacks the notion of intelligence itself—what sort humans have, and what sort AI aims at. Smith worries that, impressed by AI's reckoning prowess, we will shift our expectations of human intelligence. What we should do, he argues, is learn to use AI for the reckoning tasks at which it excels while we strengthen our commitment to judgment, ethics, and the world.

    @MelMitchell1 Excellent book. It's now my go-to guide on how hard it is to achieve AGI.

  • The Inevitable

    Kevin Kelly

    It's 2046. You don't own a car, or much of anything else, instead subscribing to items as you need them. Virtual reality is as commonplace as cell phones. You talk to your devices with hand gestures. Practically all surfaces have become a screen, and each screen watches you back. Robots and AI took over your old job but also created a new one for you, work you could not have imagined back in 2016. In The Inevitable, Kevin Kelly, the visionary thinker who foresaw the scope of the internet revolution, provides a plausible, optimistic road map for the next 30 years. He shows how the coming changes can be understood as the result of a few long-term forces that are already in motion. Kelly both describes these 12 deep trends-including cognifying our surroundings, valuing access over ownership, tracking everything-and demonstrates how they are codependent on one another. These larger forces will completely revolutionize the way we work, play, learn, buy, and communicate with each other. Ultimately, predicts Kelly, all humans and machines will be linked up into a global matrix, a convergence that will be seen as the largest, most complex, and most surprising event ever up to this time. The Inevitablewill be indispensable to anyone who seeks guidance on where to position themselves as this new world emerge.

    @kevin2kelly @Rickenhacker @thisischristina @stewartbrand @janemetcalfe BTW, your book 'The Inevitable' is indistinguishable from magic!

  • “More than anything else technology creates our world. It creates our wealth, our economy, our very way of being,” says W. Brian Arthur. Yet despite technology’s irrefutable importance in our daily lives, until now its major questions have gone unanswered. Where do new technologies come from? What constitutes innovation, and how is it achieved? Does technology, like biological life, evolve? In this groundbreaking work, pioneering technology thinker and economist W. Brian Arthur answers these questions and more, setting forth a boldly original way of thinking about technology. The Nature of Technology is an elegant and powerful theory of technology’s origins and evolution. Achieving for the development of technology what Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions did for scientific progress, Arthur explains how transformative new technologies arise and how innovation really works. Drawing on a wealth of examples, from historical inventions to the high-tech wonders of today, Arthur takes us on a mind-opening journey that will change the way we think about technology and how it structures our lives. The Nature of Technology is a classic for our times.

    @emollick I recommend https://t.co/5H2Nm8zEIg so you can get a better handle of understanding technology.

  • Going through Varela's 1979 book 'Principles of Biology and Autonomy'. https://t.co/LACoMBTkFF

  • Wayfinding

    M. R. O'Connor

    At once far flung and intimate, a fascinating look at how finding our way make us human. In this compelling narrative, O'Connor seeks out neuroscientists, anthropologists and master navigators to understand how navigation ultimately gave us our humanity. Biologists have been trying to solve the mystery of how organisms have the ability to migrate and orient with such precision—especially since our own adventurous ancestors spread across the world without maps or instruments. O'Connor goes to the Arctic, the Australian bush and the South Pacific to talk to masters of their environment who seek to preserve their traditions at a time when anyone can use a GPS to navigate. O’Connor explores the neurological basis of spatial orientation within the hippocampus. Without it, people inhabit a dream state, becoming amnesiacs incapable of finding their way, recalling the past, or imagining the future. Studies have shown that the more we exercise our cognitive mapping skills, the greater the grey matter and health of our hippocampus. O'Connor talks to scientists studying how atrophy in the hippocampus is associated with afflictions such as impaired memory, dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease, depression and PTSD. Wayfinding is a captivating book that charts how our species' profound capacity for exploration, memory and storytelling results in topophilia, the love of place. "O'Connor talked to just the right people in just the right places, and her narrative is a marvel of storytelling on its own merits, erudite but lightly worn. There are many reasons why people should make efforts to improve their geographical literacy, and O'Connor hits on many in this excellent book—devouring it makes for a good start." —Kirkus Reviews

    @SimsYStuart Along similar lines but for humans: https://t.co/OSiKcgZEmn

  • A pioneer in the field of quantum computation explores the nature and progress of knowledge in the universe, arguing that humans are subject to the laws of physics but unlimited by what can be understood, controlled, and achieved.

    @rudzinskimaciej @pp0196 @sir_deenicus @bitking69 But I recommend @DavidDeutschOxf book 'Beginning of Infinity' for an explanation of where the ability for explanation comes from and thus perhaps the G-factor.

  • Gut Feelings

    Gerd Gigerenzer

    An accessible discussion of the science behind Malcolm Gladwell's best-selling "Blink" reveals the importance of intuition in decision-making, explaining how gut feelings occur as a result of unconscious mental processes that effectively function as practical information filters.

    In popular literature, Malcolm Gladwell wrote a bestseller 'Blink' (2005) that captured the idea of intuition. Gigerenzer followed with his less known book 'Gut Feelings' (2007).

  • Debt

    David Graeber

    Here anthropologist David Graeber presents a reversal of conventional wisdom. He shows that for more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods that is, long before the invention of coins or cash. It is in this era, Graeber argues, that we also first encounter a society divided into debtors and creditors. --

    @markburgess_osl Debt is indeed a promise! https://t.co/eJkiAOyH5h. .

  • https://t.co/9rO3RZXyqr https://t.co/9DdXTgmjTt

  • The philosophy professor behind Breaking the Spell and Consciousness Explained offers exercises and tools to stretch the mind, offering new ways to consider, discuss and argue positions on dangerous subject matter including evolution, the meaning of life and free will.

    I finally finished @danieldennett 's book 'Intuition Pumps'. https://t.co/0X90wtAk2n. .

  • @EnricGuinovart Best to read Kahneman's book 'Thinking Fast and Slow'.

  • Artificial Intuition

    Carlos E Perez

    I challenge you to find a field as interesting and exciting as Deep Learning. This book is a spin-off from my previous book "The Deep Learning AI Playbook." The Playbook was meant for a professional audience. This is targeted to a much wider audience. There are two kinds of audiences, those looking to explore and those looking to optimize. There are two ways to learn, learning by exploration and learning by exploitation. This book is about exploration into the emerging field of Deep Learning. It's more like a popular science book and less of a business book. It's not going to provide any practical advice of how to use or deploy Deep Learning. However, it's a book that will explore this new field in many more perspectives. So at the very least, you'll walk away with the ability to hold a very informative and impressive conversation about this unique subject. It's my hope that having less constraints on what I can express can lead to a more insightful and novel book. There are plenty of ideas that are either too general or too speculative to fit within a business oriented book. With a business book, you always want to manage expectations. Artificial Intelligence is one of those topics that you want to keep speaking in a conservative manner. That's one reason I felt the need for this book. Perhaps the freedom to be more liberal can give readers more ideas as where this field is heading. Also, it's not just business that needs to understand Deep Learning. We are all going to be profoundly impacted by this new kind of Artificial Intelligence and it is critical we all develop at least a good intuition of how it will change the world.The images in the front cover are all generated using Deep Learning technology.

    If you prefer a physical book, the you can find this at Amazon: https://t.co/bOBUOzAwmG .

  • The Angel and the Assassin

    Donna Jackson Nakazawa

    "Until recently, microglia were thought to be the boring little housekeepers of the brain, helpfully pruning away dead cells. But science now understands them to have a terrifying Jekyll and Hyde control over brain health. When triggered, they morph into destroyers, causing a wide range of issues: from memory problems and anxiety to depression and Alzheimer's. Under the right circumstances, however, microglia are indeed angelic healers, making repairs in ways that reduce symptoms and, now that we understand their true role, could one day prevent disease. A fascinating behind-the-scenes account of the science that identified microglia as our neurological immune system, The Angel and the Assassin also explores the promising medical implications of this game-changing discovery. Award-winning journalist Jackson Nakazawa (who herself has health issues explained by microglial behavior) follows three patients as they seek to reduce their psychiatric symptoms and cognitive issues through new treatments. Giving new meaning to the mind-body connection--emotional distress alters our physical health, and our physical health impacts our mental health--the discovery of the true role of microglia in brain health could rewrite psychiatry and medical texts as we know them. The Angel and the Assassin stands to change everything we thought we knew about how to heal our bodies and our brains"--

    It turns out there's a new book on this that just came out this month: https://t.co/d1ctq1y0HR . Bought!

  • I wrote about his Jobs to be Done (JTBD) approach in my book The Deep Learning Playbook. He will be missed but his ideas will continue to resonate. https://t.co/cCZuxC1sps

  • In 2017, I wrote the book 'The Deep Learning Playbook' https://t.co/CxuR3D0Ywp that described 3 pillars of research that will drive innovation: Meta-Learning, Modularity and Game Theory.

  • “More than anything else technology creates our world. It creates our wealth, our economy, our very way of being,” says W. Brian Arthur. Yet despite technology’s irrefutable importance in our daily lives, until now its major questions have gone unanswered. Where do new technologies come from? What constitutes innovation, and how is it achieved? Does technology, like biological life, evolve? In this groundbreaking work, pioneering technology thinker and economist W. Brian Arthur answers these questions and more, setting forth a boldly original way of thinking about technology. The Nature of Technology is an elegant and powerful theory of technology’s origins and evolution. Achieving for the development of technology what Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions did for scientific progress, Arthur explains how transformative new technologies arise and how innovation really works. Drawing on a wealth of examples, from historical inventions to the high-tech wonders of today, Arthur takes us on a mind-opening journey that will change the way we think about technology and how it structures our lives. The Nature of Technology is a classic for our times.

    @gideonro Did he write this book: https://t.co/VrxmOGczLi ? Greater complexity happens because of the combinatory explosion of technologies that can be combined for use.

  • QUARK AND THE JAGUAR

    MURRAY GELL-MANN

    From one of the architects of the new science of simplicity and complexity comes an explanation of the connections between nature at its most basic level and natural selection, archaeology, linguistics, child development, computers, and other complex adaptive systems. Nobel laureate Murray Gell-Mann offers a uniquely personal and unifying vision of the relationship between the fundamental laws of physics and the complexity and diversity of the natural world.

    Gell-mann's https://t.co/b01oAPFTeJ page 229 for increasing complexity and page 231 for decreasing complexity. My intuitive explanation is slightly different.

  • Reason, we are told, is what makes us human, the source of our knowledge and wisdom. If reason is so useful, why didn't it also evolve in other animals? If reason is that reliable, why do we produce so much thoroughly reasoned nonsense? In their groundbreaking account of the evolution and workings of reason, Hugo Mercier and Dan Sperber set out to solve this double enigma. Reason, they argue with a compelling mix of real-life and experimental evidence, is not geared to solitary use, to arriving at better beliefs and decisions on our own. What reason does, rather, is help us justify our beliefs and actions to others, convince them through argumentation, and evaluate the justifications and arguments that others address to us. In other words, reason helps humans better exploit their uniquely rich social environment. This interactionist interpretation explains why reason may have evolved and how it fits with other cognitive mechanisms. It makes sense of strengths and weaknesses that have long puzzled philosophers and psychologists--why reason is biased in favor of what we already believe, why it may lead to terrible ideas and yet is indispensable to spreading good ones.--

    @YablokoU @GaryMarcus @AymericPM @MelMitchell1 No. The reasoning system that is supported by System 1 is described in the book 'The Enigma of Reason' that you have yet to finish.

  • Glad to be one of the few people who kept saying that #deeplearning was an Intuition machine (i.e. System 1) several years ago. https://t.co/9rO3RZXyqr .

  • "Damasio undertakes nothing less than a reconstruction of the natural history of the universe. . . . [A] brave and honest book." --The New York Times Book Review The Strange Order of Things is a pathbreaking investigation into homeostasis, the condition that regulates human physiology within the range that makes possible not only survival but also the flourishing of life. Antonio Damasio makes clear that we descend biologically, psychologically, and even socially from a long lineage that begins with single living cells; that our minds and cultures are linked by an invisible thread to the ways and means of ancient unicellular existence and other primitive life-forms; and that inherent in our very chemistry is a powerful force, a striving toward life maintenance that governs life in all its guises, including the development of genes that help regulate and transmit life. The Strange Order of Things is a landmark reflection that spans the biological and social sciences, offering a new way of understanding the origins of life, feeling, and culture. www.antoniodamasio.com

    @SimsYStuart @mathtick @markcannon5 Nano-intentionality. Read Damasio's book 'The Strange Order of Things'.

  • An argument that—despite dramatic advances in the field—artificial intelligence is nowhere near developing systems that are genuinely intelligent. In this provocative book, Brian Cantwell Smith argues that artificial intelligence is nowhere near developing systems that are genuinely intelligent. Second wave AI, machine learning, even visions of third-wave AI: none will lead to human-level intelligence and judgment, which have been honed over millennia. Recent advances in AI may be of epochal significance, but human intelligence is of a different order than even the most powerful calculative ability enabled by new computational capacities. Smith calls this AI ability “reckoning,” and argues that it does not lead to full human judgment—dispassionate, deliberative thought grounded in ethical commitment and responsible action. Taking judgment as the ultimate goal of intelligence, Smith examines the history of AI from its first-wave origins (“good old-fashioned AI,” or GOFAI) to such celebrated second-wave approaches as machine learning, paying particular attention to recent advances that have led to excitement, anxiety, and debate. He considers each AI technology's underlying assumptions, the conceptions of intelligence targeted at each stage, and the successes achieved so far. Smith unpacks the notion of intelligence itself—what sort humans have, and what sort AI aims at. Smith worries that, impressed by AI's reckoning prowess, we will shift our expectations of human intelligence. What we should do, he argues, is learn to use AI for the reckoning tasks at which it excels while we strengthen our commitment to judgment, ethics, and the world.

    @markcannon5 @mathtick @SimsYStuart I recommend you read some philosophy: https://t.co/GLQ3c1mUIg

  • An argument that—despite dramatic advances in the field—artificial intelligence is nowhere near developing systems that are genuinely intelligent. In this provocative book, Brian Cantwell Smith argues that artificial intelligence is nowhere near developing systems that are genuinely intelligent. Second wave AI, machine learning, even visions of third-wave AI: none will lead to human-level intelligence and judgment, which have been honed over millennia. Recent advances in AI may be of epochal significance, but human intelligence is of a different order than even the most powerful calculative ability enabled by new computational capacities. Smith calls this AI ability “reckoning,” and argues that it does not lead to full human judgment—dispassionate, deliberative thought grounded in ethical commitment and responsible action. Taking judgment as the ultimate goal of intelligence, Smith examines the history of AI from its first-wave origins (“good old-fashioned AI,” or GOFAI) to such celebrated second-wave approaches as machine learning, paying particular attention to recent advances that have led to excitement, anxiety, and debate. He considers each AI technology's underlying assumptions, the conceptions of intelligence targeted at each stage, and the successes achieved so far. Smith unpacks the notion of intelligence itself—what sort humans have, and what sort AI aims at. Smith worries that, impressed by AI's reckoning prowess, we will shift our expectations of human intelligence. What we should do, he argues, is learn to use AI for the reckoning tasks at which it excels while we strengthen our commitment to judgment, ethics, and the world.

    Must read book for anyone doing research on any kind of AI. Explains the philosophical underpinning so GOFAI and 2nd wave AI (i.e. Deep Learning). Also explains the ideas from a historical perspective. I'm a big fan of Brian Cantwell Smith. https://t.co/kSmepRxll5

  • Surfaces and Essences

    Douglas Hofstadter

    Shows how analogy-making pervades human thought at all levels, influencing the choice of words and phrases in speech, providing guidance in unfamiliar situations, and giving rise to great acts of imagination.

    @miguelalonsojr @MelMitchell1 @lexfridman Read 'Surfaces and Essences' if you want the excruciating detail of analogies. It's a very long book that gets very repetitive. But if you want the gist, head to the last chapter that compares it with 'category making'.

  • @yudapearl A key building block towards empathy is intuition. Some (like Yoshua Bengio) would call this 'system 1' in the dual process theory framework: https://t.co/SGDqiYfRJu

  • The User Illusion

    Tor Norretranders

    Explores how the "user illusion" of the computer world applies to our own consciousness, and encourages readers to find a better understanding of the consciousness and to celebrate the joys of the world

    @mpigliucci @danieldennett Another strange this is that Dennett's User Interface illusion is Tor Norretranders' https://t.co/uDkomBXNZZ . But Norretranders is never mentioned in @mpigliucci essay.

  • "Damasio undertakes nothing less than a reconstruction of the natural history of the universe. . . . [A] brave and honest book." --The New York Times Book Review The Strange Order of Things is a pathbreaking investigation into homeostasis, the condition that regulates human physiology within the range that makes possible not only survival but also the flourishing of life. Antonio Damasio makes clear that we descend biologically, psychologically, and even socially from a long lineage that begins with single living cells; that our minds and cultures are linked by an invisible thread to the ways and means of ancient unicellular existence and other primitive life-forms; and that inherent in our very chemistry is a powerful force, a striving toward life maintenance that governs life in all its guises, including the development of genes that help regulate and transmit life. The Strange Order of Things is a landmark reflection that spans the biological and social sciences, offering a new way of understanding the origins of life, feeling, and culture. www.antoniodamasio.com

    @JulioMTNeuro @JohnKubie @andpru @NatashaMhatre @OlivierCodol @paulgribble @JCashaback @action_brain @lena_pl I agree that homeostasis is the purpose. Furthermore, I claim that the brain maintains homeostasis by deciding on action. Actually, this idea is explored in greater detail in Damasio's book "The Strange Order of Things"

  • The Art of War is composed of only about 6,000 Chinese characters, it is considered by many to be the greatest book on strategy and strategic thinking ever written. . 350F PROFESSIONAL READING LIST.

    Everything about human strategy can be learned by reading the 'art of war'. Example here of regurgitating very old wisdom: https://t.co/hvi2uxMdar

  • The book starts by analyzing the problem of how we can see so well despite what, to an engineer, might seem like horrendous defects of our eyes. An explanation is provided by a new way of thinking about seeing, the "sensorimotor" approach. In the second part of the book the sensorimotor approach is extended to all sensory experience. It is used to elucidate an outstanding mystery of consciousness, namely why, unlike today's robots, humans actually can feel things. The approach makes predictions and opens research avenues, among them the phenomena of change blindness, sensory substitution, and "looked but failed to see", as well as results on color naming and color perception and the localisation of touch on the body.

    @SimsYStuart My definition of consciousness aligns with O'Regan's. https://t.co/8mCdz8Mm14 . I'm certain the trouble with consciousness debates is due to a difference in definition.

  • The Emotion Machine

    Marvin Minsky

    A leading contributor to artificial intelligence offers insight into the numerous ways in which the mind works to demonstrate how emotions and feelings are just different ways of thinking, in an account that poses controversial ideas about the potential for designing machines that are capable of thinking like humans. By the author of The Society of Mind. Reprint. 40,000 first printing.

    @ThomasODuffy I have his later book "Emotion Machine" (2007).

  • Damasio's Strange Order of Things explains these interactions in great detail: https://t.co/e22BKrykHr

  • Machine Learning

    Marco Gori Ph.D.

    Machine Learning: A Constraint-Based Approachprovides readers with a refreshing look at the basic models and algorithms of machine learning, with an emphasis on current topics of interest that includes neural networks and kernel machines. The book presents the information in a truly unified manner that is based on the notion of learning from environmental constraints. For example, most resources present regularization when discussing kernel machines, but only Gori demonstrates that regularization is also of great importance in neural nets. This book presents a simpler unified notion of regularization, which is strictly connected with the parsimony principle, and includes many solved exercises that are classified according to the Donald Knuth ranking of difficulty, which essentially consists of a mix of warm-up exercises that lead to deeper research problems. A software simulator is also included. Presents fundamental machine learning concepts, such as neural networks and kernel machines in a unified manner Provides in-depth coverage of unsupervised and semi-supervised learning Includes a software simulator for kernel machines and learning from constraints that also includes exercises to facilitate learning Contains 250 solved examples and exercises chosen particularly for their progression of difficulty from simple to complex

    @rhyolight @KordingLab The more apt term is 'constraint satisfaction'. All perception and learning is 'constraint satisfaction'. Here's a book you should read: https://t.co/vZO5peRzKm

  • Lifespan

    David A. Sinclair PhD

    A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A paradigm-shifting book from an acclaimed Harvard Medical School scientist and one of Time’s most influential people. It’s a seemingly undeniable truth that aging is inevitable. But what if everything we’ve been taught to believe about aging is wrong? What if we could choose our lifespan? In this groundbreaking book, Dr. David Sinclair, leading world authority on genetics and longevity, reveals a bold new theory for why we age. As he writes: “Aging is a disease, and that disease is treatable.” This eye-opening and provocative work takes us to the frontlines of research that is pushing the boundaries on our perceived scientific limitations, revealing incredible breakthroughs—many from Dr. David Sinclair’s own lab at Harvard—that demonstrate how we can slow down, or even reverse, aging. The key is activating newly discovered vitality genes, the descendants of an ancient genetic survival circuit that is both the cause of aging and the key to reversing it. Recent experiments in genetic reprogramming suggest that in the near future we may not just be able to feel younger, but actually become younger. Through a page-turning narrative, Dr. Sinclair invites you into the process of scientific discovery and reveals the emerging technologies and simple lifestyle changes—such as intermittent fasting, cold exposure, exercising with the right intensity, and eating less meat—that have been shown to help us live younger and healthier for longer. At once a roadmap for taking charge of our own health destiny and a bold new vision for the future of humankind, Lifespan will forever change the way we think about why we age and what we can do about it.

    Turns out David Sinclair published a new book a few months ago. https://t.co/KBo2sYxY26

  • Scale

    Geoffrey West

    Geoffrey West's book "Scale" ponders the question of why we age. He doesn't quite get to a model but discovers a universality in that a mammal's average lifespan is inversely related to its metabolism. Mice with higher metabolisms than humans live much shorter lives.

  • The philosophy professor behind Breaking the Spell and Consciousness Explained offers exercises and tools to stretch the mind, offering new ways to consider, discuss and argue positions on dangerous subject matter including evolution, the meaning of life and free will.

    @GaryMarcus @danieldennett I'll only be convinced if you can survive Daniel's lion den of 'inversion of reason'. To prepare yourself, you'll need to read @danieldennett book 'Intuition Pumps'.

  • Surfaces and Essences

    Douglas Hofstadter

    Shows how analogy-making pervades human thought at all levels, influencing the choice of words and phrases in speech, providing guidance in unfamiliar situations, and giving rise to great acts of imagination.

    @GaryMarcus @fchollet Perhaps you need to read Hofstadter's latest book https://t.co/RFWuhfyItg . Should tell you what you need to know of what's missing in today's AI. Not symbols... but analogies.

  • I'm glad I wrote a book about it two years ago: https://t.co/9rO3RZXyqr .

  • @GaryMarcus @FelixHill84 @nutanc @geoffreyhinton But a word of caution. There are many problems in the domain of modern human problems that can't be solved using an S2 system. But solving AGI isn't one of those problems. AGI is completely an S1 problem and we have biological evidence that this is true. https://t.co/MLjweGTGjc

  • Mind in Motion

    Barbara Tversky

    An eminent psychologist offers a major new theory of human cognition: movement, not language, is the foundation of thought When we describe how we think, we usually do so in terms of an internal conversation. Indeed, some have even called language the stuff of thought. But if you can fill up a bathtub with just enough water to submerge your body without flooding the bathroom, you've accomplished something remarkable: abstract thinking without using any words at all. In Mind in Motion, psychologist Barbara Tversky reveals that spatial cognition isn't just an aspect of thought, but its foundation, enabling us to draw meaning from our bodily senses and the world around us. Spatial reasoning helps us to use maps, turn strategy into plans, design skyscrapers and spacecraft, even create mathematic abstractions. Like Thinking, Fast and Slow before it, Mind in Motion gives us a new way to think about how--and where--thinking takes place.

    @KordingLab @MHendr1cks @jpmartinsci @RomainBrette I just finished reading 'Mind in Motion' by Barbara Tversky. But what you've just said means that all life is about motion. But what kind of motion do mammalian brains process that can't be processed by more primitive brains?

  • Why Greatness Cannot Be Planned

    Kenneth O. O. Stanley

    @rudzinskimaciej @IrisVanRooij @zerdeve Considering the openendeness of reality, one has to explore intrinsic motivation rather than objective function. Read: https://t.co/Mal7TuvvxL @kenneth0stanley

  • Homo Deus

    Yuval Noah Harari

    Official U.S. edition with full color illustrations throughout. NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER Yuval Noah Harari, author of the critically-acclaimed New York Times bestseller and international phenomenon Sapiens, returns with an equally original, compelling, and provocative book, turning his focus toward humanity’s future, and our quest to upgrade humans into gods. Over the past century humankind has managed to do the impossible and rein in famine, plague, and war. This may seem hard to accept, but, as Harari explains in his trademark style—thorough, yet riveting—famine, plague and war have been transformed from incomprehensible and uncontrollable forces of nature into manageable challenges. For the first time ever, more people die from eating too much than from eating too little; more people die from old age than from infectious diseases; and more people commit suicide than are killed by soldiers, terrorists and criminals put together. The average American is a thousand times more likely to die from binging at McDonalds than from being blown up by Al Qaeda. What then will replace famine, plague, and war at the top of the human agenda? As the self-made gods of planet earth, what destinies will we set ourselves, and which quests will we undertake? Homo Deus explores the projects, dreams and nightmares that will shape the twenty-first century—from overcoming death to creating artificial life. It asks the fundamental questions: Where do we go from here? And how will we protect this fragile world from our own destructive powers? This is the next stage of evolution. This is Homo Deus. With the same insight and clarity that made Sapiens an international hit and a New York Times bestseller, Harari maps out our future.

    @rudzinskimaciej @IrisVanRooij @zerdeve Brian Arthur has a good book that explores technology. Yuval Harari in Home Deus has a good historical explanation of how credit accelerates innovation. Innovation and learning are the same thing... knowledge discovery. So a meta-process is a good way to understand both.

  • I Am a Strange Loop

    Douglas R. Hofstadter

    @kanair @vijay750 Well, Hofstadter has another book "The Strange Loop" which metaphorically relates to an information closure. Cycles in Deep Learning are indeed an interesting concept that needs to be exploited more" https://t.co/do2OlsSXbL

  • Cybernetics

    Norbert Wiener

    2013 Reprint of 1961 Second Edition. Full facsimile of the original edition, not reproduced with Optical Recognition Software. Acclaimed one of the "seminal books... comparable in ultimate importance to... Galileo or Malthus or Rousseau or Mill," "Cybernetics" was judged by twenty-seven historians, economists, educators, and philosophers to be one of those books published during the "past four decades," which may have a substantial impact on public thought and action in the years ahead." -- Saturday Review. Cybernetics was defined in the mid 20th century by Norbert Wiener as "the scientific study of control and communication in the animal and the machine." Fields of study which have influenced or been influenced by cybernetics include game theory, system theory (a mathematical counterpart to cybernetics), perceptual control theory, sociology, psychology (especially neuropsychology, behavioral psychology, cognitive psychology), philosophy, architecture, and organizational theory. Contents: Part one: original edition - Newtonian and Bergsonian time - Groups and statistical mechanics - Time series, information, and communication - Feedback and oscillation - Computing machines and nervous system - Gestalt and universals - Cybernetics and psychopathology - Information, language, and society - Part two: supplement chapters - On learning and self - reproducing machines - Brain waves and self - organizing systems.

    @danbri @GaryMarcus Norbert Wiener's 1948 Cybernetics was a very good book. :-D I wonder if @GaryMarcus the many books on Cybernetics or later books involving Complex Adaptive Systems. A lot of the Enactivist Cognition arose out of this. My suspicion is that he has not. I could be wrong though.

  • Scale

    Geoffrey West

    @agonisti Read Geoffrey West's Scale https://t.co/PtSkouF2Y8

  • A New Kind of Science

    Stephen Wolfram

    NOW IN PAPERBACK"€"Starting from a collection of simple computer experiments"€"illustrated in the book by striking computer graphics"€"Stephen Wolfram shows how their unexpected results force a whole new way of looking at the operation of our universe.

    @GaryMarcus @MaharriT @NautilusMag When computers were invented did we change how we did science? Was that a fundamental change? Have you read Wolfram's ANKS, that argues that if computers came before calculus then science would be very different. To what extent is DL fundamental, that's unresolved.

  • The Inevitable

    Kevin Kelly

    It's 2046. You don't own a car, or much of anything else, instead subscribing to items as you need them. Virtual reality is as commonplace as cell phones. You talk to your devices with hand gestures. Practically all surfaces have become a screen, and each screen watches you back. Robots and AI took over your old job but also created a new one for you, work you could not have imagined back in 2016. In The Inevitable, Kevin Kelly, the visionary thinker who foresaw the scope of the internet revolution, provides a plausible, optimistic road map for the next 30 years. He shows how the coming changes can be understood as the result of a few long-term forces that are already in motion. Kelly both describes these 12 deep trends-including cognifying our surroundings, valuing access over ownership, tracking everything-and demonstrates how they are codependent on one another. These larger forces will completely revolutionize the way we work, play, learn, buy, and communicate with each other. Ultimately, predicts Kelly, all humans and machines will be linked up into a global matrix, a convergence that will be seen as the largest, most complex, and most surprising event ever up to this time. The Inevitablewill be indispensable to anyone who seeks guidance on where to position themselves as this new world emerge.

    @jim_rutt Brian Arthur's book is foundational in understanding technology. From this framework, we have to understand the existing technology landscape. Here I highly recommend @kevin2kelly book "The Inevitable". https://t.co/YaxAAgAmGu

  • “More than anything else technology creates our world. It creates our wealth, our economy, our very way of being,” says W. Brian Arthur. Yet despite technology’s irrefutable importance in our daily lives, until now its major questions have gone unanswered. Where do new technologies come from? What constitutes innovation, and how is it achieved? Does technology, like biological life, evolve? In this groundbreaking work, pioneering technology thinker and economist W. Brian Arthur answers these questions and more, setting forth a boldly original way of thinking about technology. The Nature of Technology is an elegant and powerful theory of technology’s origins and evolution. Achieving for the development of technology what Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions did for scientific progress, Arthur explains how transformative new technologies arise and how innovation really works. Drawing on a wealth of examples, from historical inventions to the high-tech wonders of today, Arthur takes us on a mind-opening journey that will change the way we think about technology and how it structures our lives. The Nature of Technology is a classic for our times.

    @eripsa @jancorazza @sugarbanter Have you read Brian Arthur? https://t.co/X3UJTrFGJS

  • @PezeshkiCharles I just began reading Antonio Damasio's new book https://t.co/e22BKrykHr . Strangely enough, he's channeling the same idea of bacteria and ants having complex social coordination.

  • Perhaps 95% of these books I haven't read when I wrote my first books https://t.co/HHvLHtJb36 and https://t.co/9rO3RZXyqr

  • Lost in Math

    Sabine Hossenfelder

    Most physicists think of beauty as the royal road to discovery; a leading critic shows it is instead the road to nowhere Whether pondering black holes or predicting discoveries at CERN, physicists believe the best theories are beautiful, natural, and elegant, and this standard separates popular theories from disposable ones. This is why, Sabine Hossenfelder argues, we have not seen a major breakthrough in the foundations of physics for more than four decades. The belief in beauty has become so dogmatic that it now conflicts with scientific objectivity: observation has been unable to confirm mindboggling theories, like supersymmetry or grand unification, invented by physicists based on aesthetic criteria. Worse, these "too good to not be true" theories are actually untestable and they have left the field in a cul-de-sac. To escape, physicists must rethink their methods. Only by embracing reality as it is can science discover the truth.

    @markburgess_osl @elonmusk @skdh has a book https://t.co/2KaUPDgWh0 that I believe tries to deconstruct 'semantic clarity'.

  • @sd_marlow In D. Dennett's book Bacteria, Bach and Back, he employs his 'Inversion of Reasoning' to human society. That is why Bach is in the title. Collectives of nano-intentional agents aren't incompatible with inversion of reasoning. This is precisely how collections become smarter!