Nait Jones

Nait Jones

Founding team at @join_royal - building the future of music and fan experiences on Web3 - sometimes I drop a few freestyle bars too - WAGMI

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10+ Book Recommendations by Nait Jones

  • @ChristenLien The book “Death” by Sadhguru https://t.co/sYCkKHrqLj

  • The New York Times bestselling author of Writing My Wrongs invites men everywhere on a journey of honesty and healing through this book of moving letters to his sons--one whom he is raising and the other whose childhood took place during Senghor's nineteen-year incarceration. Shaka Senghor has lived the life of two fathers. With his first son, Jay, born shortly after Senghor was incarcerated for second-degree murder, he experienced the regret of his own mistakes and the disconnection caused by a society that sees Black lives as disposable. With his second, Sekou, born after Senghor's release, he has experienced healing, transformation, intimacy, and the possibilities of a world where men and boys can openly show one another affection, support, and love. In this collection of beautifully written letters to Jay and Sekou, Senghor traces his journey as a Black man in America and unpacks the toxic and misguided messages about masculinity, mental health, love, and success that boys learn from an early age. He issues a passionate call to all fathers and sons--fathers who don't know how to show their sons love, sons who are navigating a fatherless world, boys who have been forced to grow up before their time--to cultivate positive relationships with other men, seek healing, tend to mental health, grow from pain, and rewrite the story that has been told about them. Letters to the Sons of Society is a soulful examination of the bond between father and sons, and a touchstone for anyone seeking a kinder, more just world.

    A perfect gift for your dad on Father’s Day - my guy @ShakaSenghor new book https://t.co/ery2wbZLCj

  • What is life? For generations, scientists have struggled to make sense of this fundamental question, for life really does look like magic: even a humble bacterium accomplishes things so dazzling that no human engineer can match it. Huge advances in molecular biology over the past few decades have served only to deepen the mystery. In this penetrating and wide-ranging book, world-renowned physicist and science communicator Paul Davies searches for answers in a field so new and fast-moving that it lacks a name; it is a domain where biology, computing, logic, chemistry, quantum physics, and nanotechnology intersect. At the heart of these diverse fields, Davies explains, is the concept of information: a quantity which has the power to unify biology with physics, transform technology and medicine, and force us to fundamentally reconsider what it means to be alive—even illuminating the age-old question of whether we are alone in the universe. From life’s murky origins to the microscopic engines that run the cells of our bodies, The Demon in the Machine journeys across an astounding landscape of cutting-edge science. Weaving together cancer and consciousness, two-headed worms and bird navigation, Davies reveals how biological organisms garner and process information to conjure order out of chaos, opening a window onto the secret of life itself.

    Weekend reading “The Demon in the Machine: How Hidden Webs of Information Are Solving the Mystery of Life” https://t.co/qwkYVMdOYa

  • Ben Horowitz, cofounder of Andreessen Horowitz and one of Silicon Valley's most respected and experienced entrepreneurs, offers essential advice on building and running a startup—practical wisdom for managing the toughest problems business school doesn’t cover, based on his popular ben’s blog. While many people talk about how great it is to start a business, very few are honest about how difficult it is to run one. Ben Horowitz analyzes the problems that confront leaders every day, sharing the insights he’s gained developing, managing, selling, buying, investing in, and supervising technology companies. A lifelong rap fanatic, he amplifies business lessons with lyrics from his favorite songs, telling it straight about everything from firing friends to poaching competitors, cultivating and sustaining a CEO mentality to knowing the right time to cash in. Filled with his trademark humor and straight talk, The Hard Thing About Hard Things is invaluable for veteran entrepreneurs as well as those aspiring to their own new ventures, drawing from Horowitz's personal and often humbling experiences.

    @JoeFernandez @mattmireles Have you read @bhorowitz book? The Hard Thing About Hard Things?

  • Traces the rise of hip-hop from a niche genre to mainstream culture, revealing how it has contributed to a new generation of multi-ethnic consumers who share experiences and values that can be tapped for marketing campaigns.

    @lolitataub Give examples where culture alone expanded TAM by reinterpreting a category in unexpected ways. Steve Stoute’s book Tanning of America has some notable examples. Apply same reasoning to your product, starting at the user, then explain why your team is authentic to that culture

  • Milk Street Fast and Slow

    Christopher Kimball

    Cook it fast or cook it slow: 150 flexible, flavorful Instant Pot and multicooker recipes designed for your schedule, from the James Beard Award-winning team of cooks at Milk Street. Instant Pots and other multicookers can transform your cooking, turning day-long simmers and braises into quick dishes that are achievable even on a busy weeknight. But did you know that the same pot is also a top-notch slow cooker, delivering make-ahead flexibility alongside the option for speed? Milk Street Fast and Slow shows you how to make the most of your multicooker's unique capabilities with a host of one-pot recipes that show how to prepare the same dish two ways. For the quickest meals, use the pressure cooker setting to cut down on cooking time. And if you prefer the flexibility of a slow cooker, you can start your cooking hours ahead. These dishes take advantage of the Milk Street approach to cooking: fresh flavor combinations and a few new techniques from around the world. The result is a compelling new approach to pressure cooking and slow cooking every day. Vegetables take center stage and shine in dozens of hearty vegetarian mains and sides like Potato and Green Pea Curry and Eggplant, Tomato, and Chickpea Tagine. Slow-cooking grains like steel-cut oats and polenta can now get on the table fast, along with Risotto with Sausage and Arugula-no standing and stirring required. Beans cooked from scratch now join the weeknight line-up. We skip the overnight soak and load up on flavor in dishes like Black Beans with Bacon and Tequila. One-pot pastas mean more flavor and less cleanup. We cook Lemony Orzo with Chicken and Arugula right in the sauce-no boiling, no draining, no problem. Chicken gains a world of flavor, from Chicken in Green Mole to Chicken Soup with Bok Choy and Ginger. Ordinarily tough cuts of pork become everyday ingredients-from Filipino Pork Shoulder Adobo and Hoisin-Glazed Baby Back Ribs to Carnitas with Pickled Red Onions Beef becomes affordable by coaxing cheap (but flavorful) cuts to tenderness. Even all-day pot roasts and Short Rib Ragu turn Tuesday night-friendly with little hands-on effort. Praise for Christopher Kimball's Milk Street"Kimball is nothing if not an obsessive tester, so every recipe has an implicit guarantee . . . Scanning the streamlined but explicit instructions, you think: easy, quick, works, boom."--The Atlantic

    @chandrakesarr Love this book

  • Swimming Across

    Andrew S. Grove

    @azeemk_ Swimming Across or Inner Engineering

  • "The founder of the Isha Foundation, an all-volunteer organization involved in large-scale humanitarian, educational, and environmental projects, Sadhguru is a thought leader on a epic scale. His mission is to improve the quality and experience of life, from the individual to the global. He has distilled a system of practices from the ancient yogic sciences that will deepen your perception and bring about a shift in the very way you experience your life, work, relationships, and the world you inhabit. It is a profound system of self-exploration and transformation, based on the radical premise that it is possible for a human being to evolve consciously. Unlike biological evolution, which happens without your conscious participation, spiritual evolution can happen consciously. All it takes is willingness."

    @azeemk_ Swimming Across or Inner Engineering

  • Mitsui

    John G. Roberts

    Om det japanske firma Mitsui og dets indflydelse på japansk historie gennem 300 år

    This book has been an incredible read https://t.co/a8wY7AypkH

  • Ben Horowitz, a leading venture capitalist, modern management expert, and New York Times bestselling author, combines lessons both from history and from modern organizational practice with practical and often surprising advice to help executives build cultures that can weather both good and bad times. Ben Horowitz has long been fascinated by history, and particularly by how people behave differently than you’d expect. The time and circumstances in which they were raised often shapes them—yet a few leaders have managed to shape their times. In What You Do Is Who You Are, he turns his attention to a question crucial to every organization: how do you create and sustain the culture you want? To Horowitz, culture is how a company makes decisions. It is the set of assumptions employees use to resolve everyday problems: should I stay at the Red Roof Inn, or the Four Seasons? Should we discuss the color of this product for five minutes or thirty hours? If culture is not purposeful, it will be an accident or a mistake. What You Do Is Who You Are explains how to make your culture purposeful by spotlighting four models of leadership and culture-building—the leader of the only successful slave revolt, Haiti’s Toussaint Louverture; the Samurai, who ruled Japan for seven hundred years and shaped modern Japanese culture; Genghis Khan, who built the world’s largest empire; and Shaka Senghor, an American ex-con who created the most formidable prison gang in the yard and ultimately transformed prison culture. Horowitz connects these leadership examples to modern case-studies, including how Louverture’s cultural techniques were applied (or should have been) by Reed Hastings at Netflix, Travis Kalanick at Uber, and Hillary Clinton, and how Genghis Khan’s vision of cultural inclusiveness has parallels in the work of Don Thompson, the first African-American CEO of McDonalds, and of Maggie Wilderotter, the CEO who led Frontier Communications. Horowitz then offers guidance to help any company understand its own strategy and build a successful culture. What You Do Is Who You Are is a journey through culture, from ancient to modern. Along the way, it answers a question fundamental to any organization: who are we? How do people talk about us when we’re not around? How do we treat our customers? Are we there for people in a pinch? Can we be trusted? Who you are is not the values you list on the wall. It’s not what you say in company-wide meeting. It’s not your marketing campaign. It’s not even what you believe. Who you are is what you do. This book aims to help you do the things you need to become the kind of leader you want to be—and others want to follow.

    My brother and friend @bhorowitz new book What You Do Is Who You Are is here. The concepts in the book illustrate how culture can either be a ruinous force or be programmed to build and sustain a great organization https://t.co/JAU9k0Nz9C

  • Ben Horowitz, a leading venture capitalist, modern management expert, and New York Times bestselling author, combines lessons both from history and from modern organizational practice with practical and often surprising advice to help executives build cultures that can weather both good and bad times. Ben Horowitz has long been fascinated by history, and particularly by how people behave differently than you’d expect. The time and circumstances in which they were raised often shapes them—yet a few leaders have managed to shape their times. In What You Do Is Who You Are, he turns his attention to a question crucial to every organization: how do you create and sustain the culture you want? To Horowitz, culture is how a company makes decisions. It is the set of assumptions employees use to resolve everyday problems: should I stay at the Red Roof Inn, or the Four Seasons? Should we discuss the color of this product for five minutes or thirty hours? If culture is not purposeful, it will be an accident or a mistake. What You Do Is Who You Are explains how to make your culture purposeful by spotlighting four models of leadership and culture-building—the leader of the only successful slave revolt, Haiti’s Toussaint Louverture; the Samurai, who ruled Japan for seven hundred years and shaped modern Japanese culture; Genghis Khan, who built the world’s largest empire; and Shaka Senghor, an American ex-con who created the most formidable prison gang in the yard and ultimately transformed prison culture. Horowitz connects these leadership examples to modern case-studies, including how Louverture’s cultural techniques were applied (or should have been) by Reed Hastings at Netflix, Travis Kalanick at Uber, and Hillary Clinton, and how Genghis Khan’s vision of cultural inclusiveness has parallels in the work of Don Thompson, the first African-American CEO of McDonalds, and of Maggie Wilderotter, the CEO who led Frontier Communications. Horowitz then offers guidance to help any company understand its own strategy and build a successful culture. What You Do Is Who You Are is a journey through culture, from ancient to modern. Along the way, it answers a question fundamental to any organization: who are we? How do people talk about us when we’re not around? How do we treat our customers? Are we there for people in a pinch? Can we be trusted? Who you are is not the values you list on the wall. It’s not what you say in company-wide meeting. It’s not your marketing campaign. It’s not even what you believe. Who you are is what you do. This book aims to help you do the things you need to become the kind of leader you want to be—and others want to follow.

    Great night at @bhorowitz @FeliciaHorowitz home discussing what culture really is. Was a treat to hear behind the scenes stories about culture and leadership in sports from Patriots owner Bob Kraft and from my friend @MCHammer. Pre order Ben’s book here https://t.co/zJ0yqDLQDj https://t.co/iIrd2Uvd6C

  • Ben Horowitz, a leading venture capitalist, modern management expert, and New York Times bestselling author, combines lessons both from history and from modern organizational practice with practical and often surprising advice to help executives build cultures that can weather both good and bad times. Ben Horowitz has long been fascinated by history, and particularly by how people behave differently than you’d expect. The time and circumstances in which they were raised often shapes them—yet a few leaders have managed to shape their times. In What You Do Is Who You Are, he turns his attention to a question crucial to every organization: how do you create and sustain the culture you want? To Horowitz, culture is how a company makes decisions. It is the set of assumptions employees use to resolve everyday problems: should I stay at the Red Roof Inn, or the Four Seasons? Should we discuss the color of this product for five minutes or thirty hours? If culture is not purposeful, it will be an accident or a mistake. What You Do Is Who You Are explains how to make your culture purposeful by spotlighting four models of leadership and culture-building—the leader of the only successful slave revolt, Haiti’s Toussaint Louverture; the Samurai, who ruled Japan for seven hundred years and shaped modern Japanese culture; Genghis Khan, who built the world’s largest empire; and Shaka Senghor, an American ex-con who created the most formidable prison gang in the yard and ultimately transformed prison culture. Horowitz connects these leadership examples to modern case-studies, including how Louverture’s cultural techniques were applied (or should have been) by Reed Hastings at Netflix, Travis Kalanick at Uber, and Hillary Clinton, and how Genghis Khan’s vision of cultural inclusiveness has parallels in the work of Don Thompson, the first African-American CEO of McDonalds, and of Maggie Wilderotter, the CEO who led Frontier Communications. Horowitz then offers guidance to help any company understand its own strategy and build a successful culture. What You Do Is Who You Are is a journey through culture, from ancient to modern. Along the way, it answers a question fundamental to any organization: who are we? How do people talk about us when we’re not around? How do we treat our customers? Are we there for people in a pinch? Can we be trusted? Who you are is not the values you list on the wall. It’s not what you say in company-wide meeting. It’s not your marketing campaign. It’s not even what you believe. Who you are is what you do. This book aims to help you do the things you need to become the kind of leader you want to be—and others want to follow.

    Heezy season approaching - order now @bhorowitz new book https://t.co/JAU9k15a1a